Most Recent Articles - YES!

YES! has a positive solution-oriented focus. We reframe issues, reflect diverse human-scale stories, and offer tools for people to use and to pass along. Here are our most recent articles and blogs.

Let’s Help Trump Keep His Promises
by David Korten
Has Trump served us all in breaking things open? Only if we use the moment for serious rethinking of policy.
Robert Reich: Do Not Pretend Trump’s Foreign Policy Is Inconsistent, Arbitrary, or Without Principle
by Robert Reich
The first principle of the Trump Doctrine: People from Muslim countries may enter the U.S. if their country contains a building with Trump’s name on it.
These Kids Used Their Spring Break to Protest Trump
by Amanda Abrams
Last week, hundreds of young people from around the country traveled to Washington, D.C. to stand up for their families and demonstrate against Trump’s immigrant policies.
How Special Elections Could Cost the Republicans
by Mark Trahant
This week, Georgia heads to the polls. Last week, the GOP in Kansas barely earned a win.
5 Old-Fashioned Ways to Predict the Weather
by Lydia Cain
Have you noticed how nature gives its own subtle forecast clues?
The Key to Feeding the World? It’s Healthy Soil
by David R. Montgomery
Conventional farming practices that degrade soil health undermine humanity’s ability to continue feeding everyone over the long run.
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The “Mother of All Bombs” Killed ISIS Fighters—But Poor Afghan Farmers Now Deal With the Trauma
by James Trimarco
One researcher reports that local farmers believed the bomb was nuclear and that they’d been exposed to radiation.
How to Turn Neighborhoods Into Hubs of Resilience
by Taj James, Rosa González
Three places showing how to make the transition from domination and resource extraction to regeneration and interdependence.
The Innovating, Creative Superpowers of ADHD
by Crystal Ponti
It is so common for self-employed people to have ADHD, the disorder could be renamed “the entrepreneur’s trait.”
Winners (and Losers) in New York’s Plan to Make College Free
by J. Gabriel Ware 
The first-in-the-nation scholarship program would serve about 1.5 million full-time students. But there are downsides.
In Berlin, a Model for Creative and Affordable Housing
by Sarah van Gelder
Cities with vibrant arts, music, and social scenes are being hit hard by gentrification. But Berlin’s “co-housing culture” shows that a city’s future doesn’t have to go that way.
Extractive Economy Jobs Are Not the Good Jobs Tribes Were Promised
by Mark Trahant
After the construction phase of the Keystone XL, only 35 employees would be needed to operate the pipeline.
What Is It Like to Live Without Running Water? Detroit Families Know
by Zenobia Jeffries
A recent study predicts that in the next five years, more than one-third of Americans will not be able to afford their water.
Stereotyping Appalachians Feeds Only the Coal Industry
by Nick Mullins
As a fifth-generation coal miner, I see the region’s Trump signs and pro-coal stickers as symbols of defense against a world that views us as lesser.