Most Recent Articles - YES!

YES! has a positive solution-oriented focus. We reframe issues, reflect diverse human-scale stories, and offer tools for people to use and to pass along. Here are our most recent articles and blogs.

The Tiny House Village Holding a Family Together
by Viola Gaskell
A tiny house complex in Seattle shows what it can do for homeless families by helping one couple raise their baby together under one (very small) roof.
The Little-Known Farmworkers Who Sparked the Biggest Labor Movement In U.S. History
by Alexa Strabuk
There would be no Cesar Chavez without the Filipino manongs of Delano, California, whose decision to strike set off the most significant labor movement the United States has ever seen.
Portland Fast Food Workers Don’t Just Want a Raise—They Want a Union Too
by Tamara Kneese
Employees at Burgerville, a Pacific Northwest restaurant chain, are unionizing and demanding benefits. Even without their employer’s recognition, their union offers an alternative model for organizing low-wage workers.
How Can Southern States Increase Voter Access for Black Residents After DMV Closures?
by YES! Staff
When DMV closures threatened Black voter access in Alabama, the government launched a traveling ID service. But is it enough?
What’s a Carbon Farmer? How California Ranchers Use Dirt to Tackle Climate Change
by Sally Neas
Scientists believe that simple land management techniques can increase the rate at which carbon is absorbed from the atmosphere and stored in soils.
Beyond the NFL: A New Plan to Treat Brain Injuries For Women Escaping Abuse
by Reagan Jackson
Unlike players in the NFL, women who struggle with lifelong effects of concussions from abuse are rarely diagnosed. In Phoenix, scientists and advocates are working to change that.
Still Saying YES!—20 Years of Solutions Journalism
by Sarah van Gelder
Like many startups, YES! Magazine began with an energized small team, an idea we thought important, and a basement office. Twenty years later, we're stronger than ever.
What Small Farms Need to Compete With Corporate Food
by Kate Stringer
Most small farms have to follow the same rules as big corporate ones. In Maine, flexible food ordinances have increased the number of small farmers.
The Pragmatic Impacts of Sanders’ Big Dreams
by Sarah van Gelder
Even with Tuesday’s campaign setbacks, Bernie Sanders’ pledge to make the country more equitable and sustainable is more realistic than some people are letting on.
How a Worker-Owned Tech Startup Found Investors—and Kept Its Values
by Nathan Schneider
As cooperative culture spreads into the tech world, Loomio is part of a new wave of entrepreneurs figuring out how to finance a more democratic, values-centered online economy.
Humanizing Heroin Addiction: Photos of the Real Lives of Users
by Aaron Goodman
Can more balanced representations of drug users spark discussions on how to solve North America’s heroin epidemic?
Retrofitting Suburbia: Communities Innovate Their Way Out of Sprawl
by Erin Sagen
The future for suburbanites, who now have twice the carbon footprint of city dwellers, seems to be pointing backward to pre-automobile, train-based living.
Happiness Inequality Is a Better Measure of Well-Being Than Income Inequality
by Kira M. Newman
Researchers say happiness reveals more about human welfare than standard indicators like wealth, education, health, or good government.
A Sanders-Clinton Combined Strategy Could Boost Native Americans’ Quality of Life
by Jennifer Biess
To meet multifaceted needs in Indian Country, Sanders and Clinton should combine their economic proposals.
National Parks Are Used Mostly By Older White People. Here’s Why That Needs to Change
by Lornet ­­­­­­­­­­­­Turnbull
With its history of segregation, the Park Service has had a rocky relationship with race. But if youth of color don’t connect with the outdoors, who will be its future stewards?