Teaching Peace & Justice

Paths to peace, inclusion, equality, and compassion for all.

Are you really what you wear?

Are You Really What You Wear?

From our popular Visual Learning series, use this photo to push your perception of Iran's people.

 

 


This Marine Biologist Taught at Occupy Camps. Now She’s Written Curriculum to Inspire Students to Action.
by Morgan Wright
Middle school and high school students constantly hear about the many challenges our society faces—from fracking to police shootings to corporatization. What they don’t hear enough about is what they can do to make their world better.
How #FergusonSyllabus Helps Teachers Discuss Police, Racism, and History
by Liz Pleasant
“Teachers are better prepared because #FergusonSyllabus created a space for exchange among educators about best practices and materials for illustrating the best and worst of our democracy.”
The Knotted Line
by Jing Fong
Get your students ready for an imaginative ride through history. The Knotted Line uses interactive media and over 50 paintings—representing historic and future events from 1495 to 2025—to explore the relationship between freedom and incarceration in America.
"Digital Empathy" Middle School Winner Bowie Shreiber
by Bowie Shreiber
Bowie Shreiber is a student at Readington Middle School in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. He read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "How the Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Bowie's essay that tells how he was able to brave the excruciating world suck stress of baseball tryouts and find awesome.
"Digital Empathy" High School Winner Ally S.
by Ally S.
Ally S. is a student at a high school in northern Virginia. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "How the Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Ally's essay that tells how she found the strength to cope with mental illness through the support of the same Nerdfighter online community.
"Digital Empathy" College Winner Shannon Hickey
by Shannon Hickey
Shannon Hickey, a student at Birmingham-Southern College in Birmingham, Alabama, read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "How the Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Shannon's essay about the solace and awesome she found on the Internet as a queer trans Catholic kid, and her desire to spread that acceptance to younger people experiencing suckiness.
"Digital Empathy" Powerful Voice Winner Tori Gardner
by Tori Gardner
Tori Gardner is a student at Shawnee Mission Horizons High School in Mission, Kansas. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "The Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Tori's essay that reveals the unexamined misogyny of the Internet, and what we can do to fight against it.
Christopher Zumski Finke's Response to "Digital Empathy" Essay Winners
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Christopher Zumski Finke responds to the winners of the Fall 2014 "Fault in Our Stars" essay competition.
"Digital Empathy" Literary Gems
by Jing Fong
We received many powerful essays for the Fall 2014 Writing Competition. Though not every participant can win the contest, we'd like to share some excerpts that caught our eye.
Visual Learning: Heart and Sole
by Jim McGowan
This Visual Learning lesson will get your students to think about prisoners—the uniforms prisoners wear and the most effective ways to prepare for their transition back into society.
The Danger of Silence
When he was a kid, slam poet and teacher Clint Smith once gave up speaking for Lent. He found that his silence allowed his classmates to be bullied—and that he must use his voice speak up for truth and justice.
Reflections on Poverty with "Nikki-Rosa" Poem
by Jing Fong
Nikki Giovanni's poem, "Nikki-Rosa" reflects on Giovanni's living with poverty—what she had, more than what she lacked. The poem, with accompanying Def Jam video and ReadWriteThink lesson will help students develop their understanding of poverty, explore their childhood experiences, and write about these reflections in a poem.
Fania Davis' Response to "Restorative Justice" Essay Winners
by Fania Davis
Fania Davis, co-founder and executive director of Restorative Justice for Oakland Youth, responds to the winners of the Spring 2014 "Restorative Justice" essay competition.
Media Resources to Empower Young People from What Kids Can Do
by Jing Fong
What Kids Can Do uses digital, print, and broadcast media to showcase the power youth can achieve when they are taken seriously. Check out writing curricula, stories, and other powerful learning resources that give voice to the opinions and talents of young people, particularly those compromised by poverty, race, and language.
Why Women's Stories Matter
by Jing Fong
March is Women's History Month. In this New York Times Learning Network lesson plan, students examine their school curriculum and personal experiences on reading stories about and by women. Through this analysis, they will deepen their understanding of why women's stories matter.