Teaching Peace & Justice

Paths to peace, inclusion, equality, and compassion for all.

Are you really what you wear?

Are You Really What You Wear?

From our popular Visual Learning series, use this photo to push your perception of Iran's people.

 

 


Visual Learning: Trouble in the Fields
This visual learning lesson will get your students thinking about the lives of migrant farm workers, and where their food comes from.
Cross the Line
Cross the Line breaks down stereotypes, and allows students a safe space to explore the diverse identities we carry.
Visual Learning: Don't Jump the Gun
This visual learning exercise will get your students thinking about how gun violence affects their communities, and ways to build safe and healthy spaces for young people to thrive.
Infographic: Gender Identity and Expression
Are you confused about how to refer to someone? He, she, or they? Gender is a complicated social construct that goes beyond the binary definition of man and woman. Help your students better understand themselves and their peers with IMPACT’s easy-to-use interactive map that explains over 40 definitions of gender.
Refugee Stories: Mapping a Crisis
The current refugee migration out of the Middle East is a pressing human rights concern. This lesson from Brown University’s Choices Program places students in a refugee’s shoes to help them understand why people flee their homes, and their arduous journey to find a safe place to live.
Resources to Teach #BlackLivesMatter
The San Francisco Unified School District has compiled a collection of no-holds-barred resources to teach #BlackLivesMatter, including “Dos and Don’ts for Teaching About Ferguson.” Dare to ask your students what they want to talk about regarding Michael Brown’s death, the roots of this tragedy, and how they can stand up to racial injustice
This Writer Brings the World to Your Classroom. She Wants Your Students to Understand the Everyday Struggles and Courage of Ordinary People.
Welcome to the world of Cleary Vaughan-Lee and Global Oneness Project, whose films, photography essays, stories, and lessons immerse you into the extraordinary lives of your global neighbors.
In a Place Where Teaching Girls Can Get You Poisoned, This Afghan Woman Got Men on Her Side
by Kristin Moe
How do you spark a movement in a conservative community? A Q&A with Razia Jan, founder of the Zabuli Education Center.
This Marine Biologist Taught at Occupy Camps. Now She’s Written Curriculum to Inspire Students to Action.
by Morgan Wright
Middle school and high school students constantly hear about the many challenges our society faces—from fracking to police shootings to corporatization. What they don’t hear enough about is what they can do to make their world better.
How #FergusonSyllabus Helps Teachers Discuss Police, Racism, and History
by Liz Pleasant
“Teachers are better prepared because #FergusonSyllabus created a space for exchange among educators about best practices and materials for illustrating the best and worst of our democracy.”
The Knotted Line
by Jing Fong
Get your students ready for an imaginative ride through history. The Knotted Line uses interactive media and over 50 paintings—representing historic and future events from 1495 to 2025—to explore the relationship between freedom and incarceration in America.
"Digital Empathy" Middle School Winner Bowie Shreiber
by Bowie Shreiber
Bowie Shreiber is a student at Readington Middle School in Whitehouse Station, New Jersey. He read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "How the Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Bowie's essay that tells how he was able to brave the excruciating world suck stress of baseball tryouts and find awesome.
"Digital Empathy" High School Winner Ally S.
by Ally S.
Ally S. is a student at a high school in northern Virginia. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "How the Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Ally's essay that tells how she found the strength to cope with mental illness through the support of the same Nerdfighter online community.
"Digital Empathy" College Winner Shannon Hickey
by Shannon Hickey
Shannon Hickey, a student at Birmingham-Southern College in Birmingham, Alabama, read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "How the Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Shannon's essay about the solace and awesome she found on the Internet as a queer trans Catholic kid, and her desire to spread that acceptance to younger people experiencing suckiness.
"Digital Empathy" Powerful Voice Winner Tori Gardner
by Tori Gardner
Tori Gardner is a student at Shawnee Mission Horizons High School in Mission, Kansas. She read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "The Real Teens Behind 'The Fault in Our Stars' Are Bringing Empathy to the Internet," by Christopher Zumski Finke. Read Tori's essay that reveals the unexamined misogyny of the Internet, and what we can do to fight against it.