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Teaching Peace & Justice

Paths to peace, inclusion, equality, and compassion for all.

Are you really what you wear?

Are You Really What You Wear?

From our popular Visual Learning series, use this photo to push your perception of Iran's people.

 

 


Visual Learning: Who Is That Masked Man? Visual Learning: Who Is That Masked Man?
Visual literacy lesson plan focusing on Guy Fawkes mask image and the issue of corporate power and deception.
Curriculum & Resources: Teaching Social Movements Curriculum & Resources: Teaching Social Movements
A collection of YES! resources for teaching about Occupy and other social movements.
Curriculum & Resources: Academy of Achievement Curriculum & Resources: Academy of Achievement
With biographies, personal interviews, and powerful images, the Academy of Achievement provides the opportunity for students to find a modern hero that resonates with their life. A content-rich Achiever Gallery of photos and a well-organized curriculum are terrific resources for hero projects or studies.
When You Tell Them My Story, Please Mention That I Like Flaming Hot Cheetos When You Tell Them My Story, Please Mention That I Like Flaming Hot Cheetos
What happens when students are given the honor and onus of writing a complete stranger's story in poetry form? Middle school students from rural and urban Oregon took the risk, transforming preconceived notions—from gangs to trailer trash, stuck up rich people to redneck hicks— into bridges.
YES! Recommends: Americans Who Tell The Truth YES! Recommends: Americans Who Tell The Truth
Americans Who Tell the Truth spotlights 170 portraits of truth tellers—people who fought for all people's rights with courage and determination—to teach students of all ages not only about their heritage, but also to stand up for what they believe in.
Curriculum & Resources: Civil Rights Curriculum Curriculum & Resources: Civil Rights Curriculum
In 1942, Fred Korematsu was arrested and convicted for refusing to go with other Japanese Americans to incarceration camps mandated under President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Executive Order No. 9066. The Fred T. Korematsu Institute for Civil Rights and Education shares lesson plans, videos, and other classroom resources to teach students the importance of speaking up for civil rights for all.
Words That Inspire: We are the 1% Words That Inspire: We are the 1%
Some members of the 1% have shared messages of solidarity with the 99%. What goes into a sign that makes a lasting impression? Explore an activity to help your students understand—and create their own—powerful signs.
Curriculum & Resources: ThinkB4YouSpeak Curriculum & Resources: ThinkB4YouSpeak
GLSEN's campaign ThinkB4YouSpeak helps straight teens understand why "that's so gay" and other common slurs may be unintentional but hurtful to their Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender (LGBT) classmates.
Curriculum & Resources: Occupy Wall Street Curriculum & Resources: Occupy Wall Street
Resources from YES! Magazine and NY Times Learning Network will familiarize your students with Occupy Wall Street.
Curriculum & Resources: The Innocence Project and Prison Food Curriculum & Resources: The Innocence Project and Prison Food
Use the Innocence Project’s interactive resources to understand the causes of wrongful convictions and exonerations, and see how your school's cafeteria food measures up to prison food with this tell-it-like-it is infographic.
Words That Inspire: Martin Luther King, Jr. Words That Inspire: Martin Luther King, Jr.
What is fair to one person may not be fair to another. How can students become aware of injustice—at school, in your community, and in this world— and dig deeper to discover how they can transform injustice to justice?
You Can’t Ignore Me Any Longer You Can’t Ignore Me Any Longer
Street artist JR brings art to improbable places, creating projects that force us to really see each other.
Waiting (or Not) for Superman Waiting (or Not) for Superman
The documentary “Waiting for Superman” has stirred up conversation and debate about one of our nation’s biggest concerns—the state of public education. A follow-up campaign is under way to fix education. NOT Waiting for Superman, initiated by Rethinking Schools, says the film got the message all wrong.
Visual Learning: Paper Cranes for Peace Visual Learning: Paper Cranes for Peace
With this YES! lesson plan, try to truly understand an image, its message, and why it’s interesting (or not). In this case it's all about peace.
Royce Baker Essay on “Heal the Warrior, Heal the Country” Royce Baker Essay on “Heal the Warrior, Heal the Country”
by Royce Baker
Royce Baker, a student at Edmonds Community College in Edmonds, Washington, read and responded to the YES! Magazine article, "Heal the Warrior, Heal the Country" by Edward Tick. Read Royce's essay on why he doesn't support war, but does support the soldier.
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