Writing Competition

Celebrating Student Writing

 

inspired writingThe YES! Exemplary Essay Project demonstrates how teachers can use YES! Magazine stories as the basis for thought-provoking writing. It also gives students an opportunity to voice their opinions and show off their stellar writing.

Learn how to participate in the YES! Exemplary Essay Project.

Christopher Zumski Finke's Response to “Less Stuff, More Heart” Essay Winners
Christopher Zumski Finke responds to the winners of our Winter 2018 Student Writing Competition.
Fall 2017 National Student Writing Competition: Standing Up for Our Neighbors
Want to inspire your students to write? Here's an opportunity to write about something meaningful and for an audience beyond the classroom.
Fall 2017: "Standing Up for Our Neighbors" Middle School Winner Ruby Rose Coney Wynne-Jones
Read Ruby's essay, "It Would Mean the World to Me," about not labeling students with dyslexia as stupid and instead getting them the help they need.
Fall 2017: "Standing Up for Our Neighbors" High School Winner Adithi Ramakrishnan
Read Adithi's essay, "Escaping the 'Other' Side," about embracing both her Indian and American roots—and how to get beyond unfriendly stares in public.
Fall 2017: "Standing Up for Our Neighbors" University Winner Amber Huff
Read Amber's essay, "To Know Her is to Love Her," about what she found beneath the hoodie and ink-stained knuckles of a new library visitor.
Fall 2017: "Standing Up for Our Neighbors" Powerful Voice Winner Alexandria Lutinski
Read Alexandria's essay, "An Unanswered Cry for Help," about living her own life after her snow globe world shatters.
Fall 2017: "Standing Up for Our Neighbors" Powerful Voice Winner Aly Terry
Read Aly's essay, "Highs and Lows," about how everyone can support people with bipolar disorder by helping them see not just the ups and downs, but all things beautiful in-between.
Fall 2017: "Standing Up for Our Neighbors" Powerful Voice Winner Logan Bailey Crews
Read Logan's essay, "Bringing a Voice Back to Life," about being pushed to the edge of the skyscraper in his head in the recent past, but focusing now on shattering the stigma of depression and mental illness at his school.
Fall 2017: "Standing Up for Our Neighbors" Literary Gems
Tracy Matsue Loeffelholz's Response to “Standing Up for Our Neighbors” Essay Winners
Tracy Matsue Loeffelholz, editorial and creative director at YES! Magazine, responds to the winners of our Fall 2017 National Student Writing Competition.
Spring 2017 National Student Writing Competition: Gender Pronouns
Want a motivator to take your students' writing to a higher level? Here's an opportunity to write about something meaningful and for a bigger audience beyond the classroom.
Spring 2017: "Gender Pronouns" Middle School Winner Alex Gerber
Read Alex's essay, "A New Design for Language," about the social and grammatical limits of gender-neutral pronouns—and how to get beyond them. Alex responded to the YES! article, "'They' and the Emotional Weight," by Cole, founder of the Brown Boi Project.
Spring 2017: "Gender Pronouns" High School Winner Ella Martinez
Read Ella's essay, "Language is a Many-Gendered Thing," about the challenges of using gender-neutral pronouns in a Puerto Rican American family. Ella responded to the YES! article, "'They' and the Emotional Weight," by Cole, founder of the Brown Boi Project.
Spring 2017: "Gender Pronouns" University Winner Avery Hunt
Read Avery's essay, "Existing Openly Is Half the Battle," about being the token nonbinary person at college while still learning about their own gender. Avery responded to the YES! article, "'They' and the Emotional Weight," by Cole, founder of the Brown Boi Project.
Spring 2017: "Gender Pronouns" Powerful Voice Winner Toby Greybear
Read Toby's essay, "The Thoughts and Struggle of a Two Spirit," about embracing a new gender identity—and rediscovering a tradition. This essay was in response to the YES! artricle, "'They' and The Emotional Weight of Words," by Cole of the Brown Boi Project.