Writing Competition

Celebrating Student Writing

 

inspired writingThe YES! Exemplary Essay Project demonstrates how teachers can use YES! Magazine stories as the basis for thought-provoking writing. It also gives students an opportunity to voice their opinions and show off their stellar writing.

Learn how to participate in the YES! Exemplary Essay Project.

Spring 2018: "Letters of Hope" Middle School Winner Lucy Shuler-Morgan
Read Lucy's letter to Emma González, activist and survivor of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting, about how González inspires countless kids like her who sometimes feel they are too young to make a difference in the world.
Spring 2018: "Letters of Hope" High School Winner Charlotte Wagner
Read Charlotte's letter to Mary Magdalene about how she's working to make sure the stories and struggles of women like her will be truthfully told and recognized.
Spring 2018: "Letters of Hope" University Winner Carly Nelson
Read Carly's letter to her friend Peach about the paradox of support systems and finding hope from those who share struggles of being disabled and fighting bureaucracy.
Spring 2018: "Letters of Hope" Powerful Voice Winner Malena Vargas Sáez
Read Malena's essay, "The Righteous Path of María the Sage," a letter to her grandmother that seeks to harness her strength and resilience in order to overcome today's corrupt and turbulent times.
Spring 2018: "Letters of Hope" Literary Gems
We received many outstanding essays for the Spring 2018 Writing Competition. Though not every participant can win the contest, we'd like to share some excerpts that caught our eye.
Carolina De Robertis Response to "Letters of Hope" Essay Winners
Carolina De Robertis responds to the winners of our Spring 2018 Student Writing Competition.
Spring 2018 National Student Writing Competition: Letters of Hope
For the 2018 spring writing competition, students will write a letter to someone they look up to, describing a future they imagine and hope for our country.
Winter 2018: "Less Stuff, More Heart" Middle School Winner Eva Vallier
Read Eva’s essay, “Stolen Stories,” about longing to hear her family’s stories about the Japanese internment and experiencing the weight of history.
Winter 2018: "Less Stuff, More Heart" High School Winner Alejandra Wagnon
Read Alejandra’s essay, “Broken Mirror,” about the challenge of living up to people's expectations and wanting to be true to one’s self.
Winter 2018: "Less Stuff, More Heart" University Winner Remy Stewart
Read Remy’s essay, “To Walk the World on Trembling Legs,” about traveling while disabled and disrupting the notion of "go as you please" that many take for granted.
Winter 2018: "Less Stuff, More Heart" Powerful Voice Winner Rhys Hardiman-Mostow
Read Rhys's essay, "A Break From Racism," about standing up to racism as a young Black woman with big dreams.
Winter 2018: "Less Stuff, More Heart" Powerful Voice Winner Jake Hill
Read Jake’s essay, “Kayla,” about the experience of unexpected loss and learning to trust the journey.
Winter 2018: "Less Stuff, More Heart" Powerful Voice Winner Heriberto Nava
Read Heriberto’s essay, “Same Dreams, Different President,” about using the power of his voice to stand up for immigrants and DACA recipients, especially those he holds close.
Winter 2018: "Less Stuff, More Heart" Literary Gems
We received many outstanding essays for the Winter 2018 Writing Competition. Though not every participant can win the contest, we'd like to share some excerpts that caught our eye.
Christopher Zumski Finke's Response to “Less Stuff, More Heart” Essay Winners
Christopher Zumski Finke responds to the winners of our Winter 2018 Student Writing Competition.