Happiness

How a Bronx Theater Uses Avant-Garde Theater to Teach Everyday Activism
by Araz Hachadourian
Whether the crisis is AIDS or cyber-bullying, Pregones Theater’s empathy-based theater techniques help young people rehearse for action.
8 Striking Portraits of People in the Path of Canada’s Mega Tar Sands Pipeline
by Kristin Moe
TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline would span thousands of miles, from rural Alberta to the Atlantic coast of New Brunswick.
“The Internet Is My Lifeline”: Hip-Hop Artist Jasiri X on the FCC’s Net Neutrality Vote
by Kayla Schultz
The political artist from Pittsburgh speaks about the importance of the Internet and social media in making the voices of low-income people of color heard.
“We've Known What Police Brutality Feels Like”: Pussy Riot’s Tribute Song to Eric Garner
by Christopher Zumski Finke
In a new music video, two members from Russian punk band Pussy Riot get dirt shoveled over their faces and are buried alive. It's powerful and disturbing to watch.
Is the Maker Movement About Hacking Society—Or Just Hardware?
by Kayla Schultz
At feminist hackerspaces, members are less interested in digital trespassing than in developing a safe community for experimenting, creating, and collaborating.
Musicians From Egypt to Rwanda Are Blending Musical Traditions and Building Unity to Protect the Nile River Basin
by Valerie Schloredt
The Nile Project is made up of musicians from different countries, musical genres, and traditions. Their purpose? To promote cooperation and cultural understanding as the diverse peoples of the Nile face threats from water scarcity and climate change.
What a Real-Life Rosie the Riveter Taught This Feminist Geek
by Lindsey Weedston
Before meeting Geraldine, I’d assumed that most of the women from the 1940s were unaware of how capable they were. I was wrong.
Sharing Music Builds Trust, Empathy, and Cooperation—Here Are Four Ways Science Proves It
by Jill Suttie
There is something about listening to music, or playing it with other people, that makes you feel connected to those around you. Even science says so.
These Gorgeous Photographs Show Indigenous Americans Without the Stereotypes
by Natasha Donovan
Three years ago, Matika Wilbur set out on an ambitious undertaking: a vast road trip across America to photograph members of all 562 of America’s federally-recognized tribes.
Everything You Need to Know About the Radical Roots of Wonder Woman
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Her enigmatic creator believed women were destined to rule the world. 10 facts about the iconic heroine.
Science Fiction and the Post-Ferguson World: “There Are as Many Ways to Exist as We Can Imagine”
by Mary Hansen
Radical science fiction and fantasy are a remedy for the belief that there is no alternative to the violence and inequality that surround us.
An Alaska Native Myth Tells of a Never-Ending Blizzard—Now You Can Learn About It on Xbox
by Christopher Zumski Finke
The first video game developed by an indigenous-owned company uses gaming’s immersive storytelling style to connect players with Alaska Native culture.
The Hunger Games Are Back: “Saw Mockingjay—Now I Want to Go Solve All the World's Problems”
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Check out #MyHungerGames—the latest installment of fan activism that gets young people talking about real-life inequality.
The Avengers Join Guardians of the Galaxy and Other Marvel Heroes to Make Bullying History
by Christopher Zumski Finke
“The center of Marvel’s storytelling history is the eternal struggle between good and evil, with many of its greatest superheroes having to contend with—and rise above—bullying, in all its forms.”
Before the Zombie Apocalypse—These 4 Trade Deals Were Ravaging the World!
by James Trimarco, Marc J. Palm
Forget ghouls and goblins. From deregulating Wall Street to shredding environmental and labor protections—these policy monsters are way scarier.