Dar Williams: Why the Music of Protest Is Still Worth Defending
by Madeline Ostrander
We can’t change the world if we can’t even sing together—a star folk singer on what happens if political music dies.
How a Detroit Conference Is Shaping the Future of Feminism
by Dani McClain
For a few short days at the Allied Media Conference, change makers immerse themselves in the world they’d like to live in.
Don’t Wait for the Revolution—Live It
by Andrew Boyd
When pranksters and creative organizers create temporary utopias, the experience leaves us wanting more—and ready to work hard to get it.
Pussy Riot’s “Punk Prayer” Reminds Us to Cherish Freedom of Spirit—Not Just Speech
by Christa Hillstrom
What we still have to learn from the world’s favorite riot grrrls.
Melodeego: The Hippest Bike-Powered Band in Town
by Chuck Collins
Melodeego has been making music for the environment for years. Their songs include protests of the Keystone XL pipeline and other topics inspired by the anti-climate change movement.
“Modified Social Benches”: An Experiment in Outdoor Socializing
by Cat Johnson
An installation of creatively shaped benches in Belgium pushes the edge of urban sit-ability.
Mothers Day Cards that Actually Depict Our Moms
by Corey Hill
The reality of motherhood in America has little in common with the comfortable images portrayed in cards and on TV. A set of Mothers Day e-cards you can send for free shows moms that better reflect our diverse society.
Would Smokey the Bear Get Arrested to Stop Fracking?
by Peter Rugh
When artist Lopi LaRoe used Smokey the Bear imagery to encourage anti-fracking activism, the Forest Service threatened her with a lawsuit.
Star Trek’s George Takei: Putting Facebook Fame to Good Use
by Mark Engler
Famous for his role as Mr. Sulu on Star Trek, today George Takei uses the popularity of his kitchy humor to promote discussion about the rights of women and LGBT people.
Love Your Books? 4 Ways to Share Them With Others
by Fabien Tepper, Signe Predmore
From mobile libraries to tiny libraries, how to get others to read the books you love.
Visual Learning: Out of Character
by Jing Fong
This Visual Learning activity will get your students thinking about the intersection of handwriting and digital typeface, and the fate of cursive writing around the world.
Remembering Chinua Achebe, Nigeria’s Master Storyteller
by YES! online staff
The great Nigerian author and essayist Chinua Achebe died on Thursday in Boston. In this interview with Bill Moyers, first broadcast in 1988, he explains why “The storyteller has a different agenda from the emperor.”
Why You Don’t Frack With John Lennon’s Farm
by Lisa Mullenneaux
When fracking hits close to home, Mark Ruffalo, Debra Winger, Yoko Ono, and other big names find common ground with small towns.
Robot Dogs and Other Weird Creatures Bring Nature to the City
by Natalie Pompilio
How to create a world where people fly, salamanders text, and trash is useful.
Pete Seeger: “You Stick Together ’Til It’s Won”
by Kim Ruehl
Book Review: Gleaned from letters, essays, and articles, “Pete Seeger: In His Own Words” reveals how the celebrated folk singer has considered, at every turn, what it means to sing out in a world where the din of injustice is deafening.