Happiness

After a Century In Decline, Black Farmers Are Back And On the Rise
by Leah Penniman
These Black farmers don’t stop at healthy food. They’re healing trauma, instilling collective values, and changing the way their communities think about the land.
The Tiny House Village Holding a Family Together
by Viola Gaskell
A tiny house complex in Seattle shows what it can do for homeless families by helping one couple raise their baby together under one (very small) roof.
Retrofitting Suburbia: Communities Innovate Their Way Out of Sprawl
by Erin Sagen
The future for suburbanites, who now have twice the carbon footprint of city dwellers, seems to be pointing backward to pre-automobile, train-based living.
Happiness Inequality Is a Better Measure of Well-Being Than Income Inequality
by Kira M. Newman
Researchers say happiness reveals more about human welfare than standard indicators like wealth, education, health, or good government.
How a Health Clinic Made a Local Grocery Store Part of Its Prescription
by Bob Van Meter
A partnership between a Boston health clinic and a local grocery shows what economic development can do when it makes community health a priority.
Why Does Being a Man Require So Many Masks?
by Terrance Hayes
National Book Award-winning poet Terrance Hayes writes about fatherhood and his own struggle to negotiate Americans' narrow definition of masculinity.
The Science Behind Why Good Things Really Do Happen to People Who Wait
by Kira M. Newman
Religions and philosophers have long praised the virtue of patience; now researchers are starting to do so as well.
The Future of Libraries Is Bigger Than Books
by Cat Johnson
Modern libraries are essential in underserved communities as places where everyone is welcome to gather, work, borrow materials, or just spend time.
What’s It Like to Be the New Kid and a Refugee?
by Jaclyn Zubrzycki
Small town and suburban public schools become welcome centers as more immigrants are moving outside major metropolitan areas.
Politics on the Dance Floor: Reclaiming Queer and Black Roots in Electronic Dance Music
by Keith Barbalato
As the multibillion-dollar electronic music industry grows, artists and organizers are taking back the spaces and sounds of the marginalized people who started the genre.
You Know What’s Really Gross? Not Periods, But Taxes on Periods
by Lynsi Burton
Class action lawsuits point out the irrationality of sales-tax exemptions for items such as Rogaine, foot powder, and Viagra—but not menstrual products.
No Fossil Fuel? No Problem—7 Ways We're Already Living More Locally
by YES! Staff
From affordable transit to local food for school lunches, many people across America are already on their way to living a life without oil.
Is Human Composting the Future of Death?
by Jennifer Luxton
Skip the formaldehyde. How your body could become beautiful soil.
Meet the Jeans-Wearing, Nature-Loving Nuns Who Helped Stop a Kentucky Pipeline
by Laura Michele Diener
As fewer women enter the convent, what will become of Kentucky’s tradition of socially and environmentally engaged religious women?
Proud of Our Pidgin: The Newest Language in the U.S. Census
by Sheldon Ito
When Hawaiian Pidgin Creole joined an official list of 350 languages spoken in U.S. homes, it lifted up communities throughout Hawai‘i and their rich immigrant history.