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Great Bear Rainforest :: Photo Essay :: 21

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Thumbnail image. Photo  Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo  Tim Ennis Photography
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Photo  Tim Ennis Photography
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Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
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G’psgolox Pole

This is the top portion of a replica of the original G’psgolox pole, which was erected on the same location as the original pole at the ancient Haisla-Henaaksiala village site of Misk’usa in the Kitlope. The original pole was stolen in 1927 by Iver Fougner, the Government of Canada’s Indian Agent for the area at the time. He subsequently sold the pole to Olof Hanson for a museum in Sweden. The indigenous inhabitants had been relocated by then, and were initially unaware of it’s being stolen.

Over 70 years later with the help of the archaeological community, the Haisla were able to find the pole in Sweden. After an epic journey, which was even the subject of a wonderful National Film Board of Canada documentary, the Haisla have finally been successful in repatriating the original pole, which now is at “home” in Kitimaat Village.

The story relating to this pole is remarkable. Not too long ago, around the time of contact with Europeans, an epidemic disease swept the BC coast, leaving a path of death in its wake. At Misk’usa, the entire population of the village was decimated, save one man. This man, beside himself with grief, wandered into the forest behind the village to mourn his family and loved ones. He was approached by a small spirit figure (depicted on the pole) who gave him a magical crystal and instructed him on how to use it. With this crystal, the man was able to heal his family, and restore them to life.

For more information on this and the Haisla people, see the Nanakila website.

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YES Story button spacer :: UPDATE
Historic Accord Protects B.C. Forests
First Nations are gaining more control over their traditional lands while considerations of sustainability are becoming central to forestry planning.

YES Archive button spacer :: SIGN OF LIFE
Rainforest Logging Shutdown in BC
The British Columbia logging company MacMillan Bloedel announced January 8, 1997, that it is shutting down its logging operations in the Clayoquot Sound rainforest, BC.



Tim Ennis Flickr icon Photographer Tim Ennis is Director of Land Stewardship, BC Region, for the Nature Conservancy of Canada, a non-profit group that protects biodiversity in Canada through various mechanisms, most notably including direct land purchases. Several of the images here are taken of NCC lands.

Communicating the beauty of this region and raising awareness are Tim's main goals with his photographs: "I hope to motivate people to help in whatever way they can to join in the preservation of biodiversity (and cultural diversity) here in British Columbia, or where ever home may be for you!"

See more of Tim's photos of the Great Bear Rainforest, and the rest of his amazing work on Flickr, and at the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

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