Sections
Home » Issues » A Just Foreign Policy » Great Bear Rainforest :: Photo Essay :: 11

Get a FREE Issue. Yes! I want to try YES! Magazine

Nonprofit. Independent. Subscriber-supported. DONATE. How you can support our work.

YES! by Email
Join over 78,000 others already signed up for FREE YES! news.
[SAMPLE]

The YES! ChicoBag(R). Full-size tote that fits in your pocket!

 

Great Bear Rainforest :: Photo Essay :: 11

Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography spacer Thumbnail image. Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
spacer
Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Photo © Tim Ennis Photography
spacer
Devil’s Club

One of the most sacred and powerful plants in North America, Devil’s club (Oplopanax horridum) is particularly important to First Nations people for medicinal and spiritual purposes. Worldwide, indigenous cultures commonly understand prickly or thorny plants as possessing the spiritual qualities of protection against evil, unwanted forces or illness. Interesting that the English name implies that the Devil would use the thorny, club-like stems of this plant to cause suffering, when in fact, indigenous peoples put pieces of stem in the 4 corners of rooms, or over doorways to ward off evil.

There are many different ways in which this plant can be prepared for medicinal or spiritual uses. According to some elders I’ve spoken with, there are also important traditional practices involved with enhancing local populations of Devil’s club in order to sustain harvesting it. Western herbalists have also come to appreciate the medicinal values of Devil’s club and it is available in raw form in the bulk section of many health food stores. Unfortunately, it may be wild-harvested to supply this market, without due concern paid to re-planting or enhancing good patches. In some areas, local populations have been wiped out as a result.

spacer
spacer
11 of 22
spacer
YES Story button spacer :: UPDATE
Historic Accord Protects B.C. Forests
First Nations are gaining more control over their traditional lands while considerations of sustainability are becoming central to forestry planning.

YES Archive button spacer :: SIGN OF LIFE
Rainforest Logging Shutdown in BC
The British Columbia logging company MacMillan Bloedel announced January 8, 1997, that it is shutting down its logging operations in the Clayoquot Sound rainforest, BC.



Tim Ennis Flickr icon Photographer Tim Ennis is Director of Land Stewardship, BC Region, for the Nature Conservancy of Canada, a non-profit group that protects biodiversity in Canada through various mechanisms, most notably including direct land purchases. Several of the images here are taken of NCC lands.

Communicating the beauty of this region and raising awareness are Tim's main goals with his photographs: "I hope to motivate people to help in whatever way they can to join in the preservation of biodiversity (and cultural diversity) here in British Columbia, or where ever home may be for you!"

See more of Tim's photos of the Great Bear Rainforest, and the rest of his amazing work on Flickr, and at the Nature Conservancy of Canada.

spacer
Email Signup
A Just Foreign Policy
Comment on this article

How to add a commentCommenting Policy

comments powered by Disqus


You won’t see any commercial ads in YES!, in print or on this website.
That means, we rely on support from our readers.

||   SUBSCRIBE    ||   GIVE A GIFT   ||   DONATE   ||
Independent. Nonprofit. Subscriber-supported.




Current Issue Footer

Personal tools