Give Gifts Top Banner

Sections
Home » Issues » Food for Everyone » New Crop of Farmers :: Brian & Meghan Peterka

Get a FREE Issue. Yes! I want to try YES! Magazine

Nonprofit. Independent. Subscriber-supported. DONATE. How you can support our work.

YES! by Email
Join over 78,000 others already signed up for FREE YES! news.
[SAMPLE]

The YES! ChicoBag(R). Full-size tote that fits in your pocket!

 

New Crop of Farmers :: Brian & Meghan Peterka

Document Actions

Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Photo of a young farmer.
11 of 13
Shoreline, WA

By 2006, Brian had been an environmental consultant for nearly 10 years. Though they owned a nice house in the Seattle area and Meghan was able to spend her days at home with the kids, the Peterkas felt that "Life was going by too fast.” So they packed up their two young children, Devon and Zeth, and interned at a berry farm for two years. Brian and Meghan are now in the process of converting their Shoreline, WA, home into an urban farm.

“Every job we previously worked was for the sole purpose of making money to pay the bills. Although we were living relatively comfortable lives, our days had become rather routine and there was an underlying sense of emptiness and dissatisfaction. We often asked ourselves what we could do that would interest us and help make a difference. One of Meghan's dreams was to make good food available to those in urban environments who otherwise didn’t have access to it due to location or income level.

 “We finally decided to take a chance. Brian put in his notice at work and we found someone to rent our house. We spent the next two years living on a small organic berry farm 20 miles east of Seattle. We maintained the berry operation, grew and sold vegetables, took care of farm animals, and generally helped out with all farm tasks. We were finally doing something that was important to us, living intentionally, growing most of our own food. Our family was together every day.  We were happier, even though we were making about one-eighth of our previous income.

“We moved back to our home in the fall of 2008 and started developing our 7,000 square-foot residential property into an ‘urban farm.’ We are in the process of removing the grass lawns, the ornamental trees and shrubs, the concrete driveway, and the back patio to make room for vegetables, fruit and nut trees, grapes, berries, mushroom patches, and flowers.

“For us, urban farming is not intended to be a commercial enterprise, but rather a community activity. We want to get people interested and involved in growing their own food, and sharing, trading or bartering any surpluses with the community. It is through urban farming that our dreams, interests and passions are being fulfilled.”


Anna Stern and Kim NochiAnna Stern and Kim Nochi interviewed the young farmers in this series for Food for Everyone, the spring 2009 issue of YES! Magazine. Anna and Kim are editorial interns at YES!

 

Email Signup
Food for Everyone
Comment on this article

How to add a commentCommenting Policy

comments powered by Disqus


You won’t see any commercial ads in YES!, in print or on this website.
That means, we rely on support from our readers.

||   SUBSCRIBE    ||   GIVE A GIFT   ||   DONATE   ||
Independent. Nonprofit. Subscriber-supported.




Issue Footer

Personal tools