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New Crop of Farmers :: Gailey R. Morgan III

Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Thumbnail image of a young farmer
Photo of a young farmer.
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Tesuque Natural Farm, Tesuque Pueblo, NM

A member of the Tesuque Pueblo and Meskwaki Nations, Gailey works at the 10-acre tribal farm raising food for the Tesuque Pueblo people.

“It seems like I just fell into farming. When I came to the Pueblo, I had just turned a father and was raising my daughter. One of the gentlemen from the Tesuque Natural Farm asked if I’d ever been into farming. I told him no. He asked me if I’d like to get involved with the program. Things took off from there.

 “Our people here have been farmers for centuries. You always hear stories about how they’d go out and farm the land. It’s good to be out here taking care of the land, taking care of the water, taking care of the Mother Earth. You plant crops and see them grow, then you harvest them and eat them. You keep the seed. You know you’re going to preserve that seed for the following year and for years to come. It’s very rewarding to bring the food home to my family, my uncles and aunts. When we harvest we go right away to the Head Start and give it to the kids there, and to the elders at the senior center. They’re always very appreciative of the food that comes from the farm. It gives me a good feeling.

“That first year, the director brought an ear of Hopi blue corn. From that one ear of Hopi blue corn it’s made a lot of corn. It’s been 10 years. We still have that seed now.”


Anna Stern and Kim NochiAnna Stern and Kim Nochi interviewed the young farmers in this series for Food for Everyone, the spring 2009 issue of YES! Magazine. Anna and Kim are editorial interns at YES!

 

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