Give Gifts Top Banner

Sections
Home » Issues » Learn as You Go » Signs of Life :: Act Two for Clean Water

Get a FREE Issue. Yes! I want to try YES! Magazine

Nonprofit. Independent. Subscriber-supported. DONATE. How you can support our work.

YES! by Email
Join over 78,000 others already signed up for FREE YES! news.
[SAMPLE]

The YES! ChicoBag(R). Full-size tote that fits in your pocket!

 

Signs of Life :: Act Two for Clean Water

Document Actions
— tags:

WATER

Act Two for Clean Water

gran-limpieza.jpg

Volunteers remove litter along the Los Angeles River during La Gran Limpieza, a cleanup day held May 9 by Friends of the Los Angeles River. Participants hauled out a total of 37,000 pounds of trash from more than a dozen sites. A Supreme Court ruling removed the river from protection under the Clean Water Act. A bill being considered in the Senate would restore that protection.

Photo by Peter Bennett

The U.S. Senate may be poised to undo a Bush-era policy that undercut protection of the nation’s waterways.

Until 2002, the U.S. EPA and the Army Corps of Engineers had the authority to keep pollution out of creeks and stop builders from paving over small wetlands.

But two rulings on the Clean Water Act by the U.S. Supreme Court took a narrow reading of the law’s language, limiting the Act’s jurisdiction to “navigable waterways” and the small streams and rivers that are connected to them.

The rulings stripped protection from 20 million acres of wetlands and 60 percent of the nation’s stream miles, such as the Los Angeles River and nearly all of Arizona’s small streams.

Now 24 senators have sponsored a bill that would restore those protections. The Clean Water Restoration Act has passed the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, and is headed for the Senate floor. The act has the support of a large number of environmental, wildlife, and fishing and hunting groups, along with the Water Environment Federation, which represents the water treatment industry, though the law is meeting resistance from big agriculture and developers.

—Madeline Ostrander

ALSO …

Bundanoon, Australia, May be First to Legally Ban Bottled Water

Thumb Up IconIn a July 4 vote, Bundanoon, Australia, may have become the first community in the world to legally ban bottled water. The ban was promoted through the grassroots “Bundy On Tap” campaign. The town plans to implement the law by September, once it sets up bottled water alternatives, such as several new free filtered “water stations” to be placed around the community.

 


More Signs of Life

CLIMATE CHANGE
:: Amazon Tribes Win Against Big Oil
Also ...
India's “National Solar Mission”

ECONOMY
:: Sit-In Keeps Factory Open
Also ...
Green Economy Is Outperforming the Rest of the Global Economy

ELECTIONS
:: Legal Settlements Protect Voters

spacer

FOOD
:: Cities Eat Local

HUMAN RIGHTS
:: Tribes Approve Same-Sex Marriage

WATER
:: Act Two for Clean Water
Also ...
Bundanoon, Australia, May be First to Legally Ban Bottled Water

 

Email Signup
Learn as You Go
Comment on this article

How to add a commentCommenting Policy

comments powered by Disqus


You won’t see any commercial ads in YES!, in print or on this website.
That means, we rely on support from our readers.

||   SUBSCRIBE    ||   GIVE A GIFT   ||   DONATE   ||
Independent. Nonprofit. Subscriber-supported.




Issue Footer

Filed under:
Personal tools