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End of Poverty

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We've got the money, do we have the will?

The gap between the wealthy and the poor widens daily in America. And the prevailing story says poverty is inevitable—a natural part of the human condition. In this issue we show how the richest country in history chose policies that create an impoverished underclass—and how different choices will end poverty.

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How America's Largest Worker Owned Co-Op Lifts People Out of Poverty How America's Largest Worker Owned Co-Op Lifts People Out of Poverty
by Laura Flanders
Cooperative Home Care Associates' 2,300 workers enjoy good wages, regular hours, and family health insurance. With an investment of $1.2 million into the cooperative sector, New York City is hoping to build on the group's success.
The Faces Behind the Fight for $15 an Hour The Faces Behind the Fight for $15 an Hour
by Betty Udesen
For low-wage workers, Seattle's minimum wage increase means a chance to go to college, pay the rent, and visit the dentist.
The Antidote to Mansplaining: Rebecca Solnit on Everyday Sexism and What We Can Do About It The Antidote to Mansplaining: Rebecca Solnit on Everyday Sexism and What We Can Do About It
by Valerie Schloredt
Useful as it may be as journalistic shorthand, “mansplaining” is cultural bubblegum in comparison to Solnit’s actual body of work.
7 Practical Ideas for Compassionate Communities, From Free College to Debt Relief 7 Practical Ideas for Compassionate Communities, From Free College to Debt Relief
by Shannan Stoll
It's not hard to bring a little more equality into each others' lives.
The Enchanted Land Where Community College Is Free? Welcome to Tennessee in 2015 The Enchanted Land Where Community College Is Free? Welcome to Tennessee in 2015
by Yessenia Funes
A new bill provides two years of tuition at a community college for participating high school grads who might otherwise face a 7.5 percent unemployment rate—and other states are already following suit.
Matt Damon, Harrison Ford Lead All-Star Cast in Showtime Climate Change Series Matt Damon, Harrison Ford Lead All-Star Cast in Showtime Climate Change Series
by Dana Drugmand
Years of Living Dangerously features celebrity correspondents who thoughtfully explore how politics and religion divide people and impede action on this critical issue.
The Key to a Sustainable Future Is Resisting Violence Every Day The Key to a Sustainable Future Is Resisting Violence Every Day
by Yessenia Funes
The Nonviolence Handbook teaches that when we exhibit patience and refrain from criticizing others harshly, we're building nonviolent potential.
A Wall Street Equity Firm Evicted My Family. We’re Still Searching for a Home A Wall Street Equity Firm Evicted My Family. We’re Still Searching for a Home
by Michael Donley
Our experience strengthened our resolve to fight for housing as a human right.
If Unions Are Breaking Automakers, Why Are BMW and Mercedes So Rich? If Unions Are Breaking Automakers, Why Are BMW and Mercedes So Rich?
by Thom Hartmann
In Germany, auto workers get paid well and their companies still profit. Author Thom Hartmann on why living wages and corporate success don't have to be mutually exclusive.
Americans Spend $1.8 Billion on Eating Out Every Day (And 23 Other Facts You Should Probably Know) Americans Spend $1.8 Billion on Eating Out Every Day (And 23 Other Facts You Should Probably Know)
by Dana Drugmand, Yessenia Funes
Meanwhile, more Americans got insured, the oceans continued to become more acidic, and the world’s largest collection of rubber ducks grew at a rapid pace.
A Wealthy Capitalist on Why Money Doesn't Trickle Down A Wealthy Capitalist on Why Money Doesn't Trickle Down
by Nick Hanauer
Nick Hanauer, venture capitalist and self-described “plutocrat,” says a healthy economy and an effective democracy depend on a thriving middle class of workers.
Migrant Farmworkers Find Paths Out of Poverty Through Incubator Farms Migrant Farmworkers Find Paths Out of Poverty Through Incubator Farms
by Lisa Gale Garrigues
Incubator farms help seasonal workers start their own businesses, where they get better pay and the support of a community.
Most Social Change Groups Grapple with White Privilege—But This Book Can Help Most Social Change Groups Grapple with White Privilege—But This Book Can Help
by Joshua Kahn Russell
The work of activism is full of messy contradictions. In “Towards Collective Liberation,” Chris Crass breaks down the influence of racism and patriarchy, including helpful how-tos—like “Twenty Careful Steps Toward Anti-sexist Action.”
Why a Tiny Decrease in Unemployment Means a Big Pay Raise for the Poor Why a Tiny Decrease in Unemployment Means a Big Pay Raise for the Poor
by Dean Baker
A sustained one-percentage-point decline in the unemployment rate is associated with a 9.4 percent rise in the wages of workers in the bottom quintile of the wage distribution.
Poverty Is Not Inevitable: What We Can Do Now to Turn Things Around Poverty Is Not Inevitable: What We Can Do Now to Turn Things Around
by Dean Paton
Having poor people in the richest country in the world is a choice. We have the money to solve this. But do we have the will?
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