New Economy

Who’s Lobbying for Millennial Interests? Meet the “AARP for Young People”
by Araz Hachadourian
This is the first election year with the same number of millennial voters as baby boomers. Here’s how lobbyists for young people could change our politics on prisons, climate, and student debt.
With More Americans Going Far Left (And Right), an Anti-Corporate Agenda Takes Shape
by David Korten
Voters hit hardest by free-trade economics are rebelling against the status quo. We can use that energy to build a powerful, grassroots movement for democracy.
How Much Does It Cost to Win a Seat in the U.S. Senate?
by Keith Barbalato, Kate Stringer
And other things you should probably know.
Why Not Getting Married Is Smart Economics For Women
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
More people than ever before are choosing not to get married. And for women, that can actually be a good thing.
Choosing a President in a Time of Climate Crisis
by Sarah van Gelder
Our next president must be someone who understands the science of climate change and can build a clean energy future.
“Evil World Banking” Explained
by Yessenia Funes
In less than two minutes, John Perkins, author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, explains how corporations can take over entire nations through predatory loans and debt collection.
Why Give Breaks to Huge Corporations When We Could Invest Public Money Down the Street?
by Kasia Tarczynska
Cities and states fork over an estimated $70 billion each year to large companies that don’t need public assistance to thrive. We could spend that money on our own neighborhoods.
Why the Economy Should Stop Growing—And Just Grow Up
by David Korten
“How do we grow the economy?” is an obsolete question. Local initiatives across the world are looking for maturity instead as they rebuild caring, place-based communities and economies.
Immigration Is Not Just a Latino Thing. Here’s Why We Need Black Leaders
by Anshantia Oso
For years, the immigrant rights movement has been largely led by Latinos. Today, Black leadership is playing an increasingly important role in the grassroots fight to change U.S. immigration policy.
The Little-Known Farmworkers Who Sparked the Biggest Labor Movement In U.S. History
by Alexa Strabuk
There would be no Cesar Chavez without the Filipino manongs of Delano, California, whose decision to strike set off the most significant labor movement the United States has ever seen.
Portland Fast Food Workers Don’t Just Want a Raise—They Want a Union Too
by Tamara Kneese
Employees at Burgerville, a Pacific Northwest restaurant chain, are unionizing and demanding benefits. Even without their employer’s recognition, their union offers an alternative model for organizing low-wage workers.
What’s a Carbon Farmer? How California Ranchers Use Dirt to Tackle Climate Change
by Sally Neas
Scientists believe that simple land management techniques can increase the rate at which carbon is absorbed from the atmosphere and stored in soils.
What Small Farms Need to Compete With Corporate Food
by Kate Stringer
Most small farms have to follow the same rules as big corporate ones. In Maine, flexible food ordinances have increased the number of small farmers.
The Pragmatic Impacts of Sanders’ Big Dreams
by Sarah van Gelder
Even with Tuesday’s campaign setbacks, Bernie Sanders’ pledge to make the country more equitable and sustainable is more realistic than some people are letting on.
How a Worker-Owned Tech Startup Found Investors—and Kept Its Values
by Nathan Schneider
As cooperative culture spreads into the tech world, Loomio is part of a new wave of entrepreneurs figuring out how to finance a more democratic, values-centered online economy.