New Economy

As Boomers Retire, Mom-and-Pop Businesses Convert to Co-ops to Save Jobs
by Keli Tianga
Baby boomers are the largest percentage of business owners, and they’re headed toward retirement. Worker cooperatives could keep the jobs they’ve created from disappearing.
What the War on Reproductive Rights Has to do With Poverty and Race
by Renee Bracey Sherman
Forty years after Roe v. Wade, discourse about reproductive rights must acknowledge how crucial the abortion decision is to gender equity, economic stability, and a healthy life free from violence.
Amid Election Chaos, Communities Show Where the Real Power Is
by Sarah van Gelder
In every community I visited, I found people working hard to lay a different foundation for our society.
Tribes Create Their Own Food Laws to Stop USDA From Killing Native Food Economies
by Tristan Ahtone
From blue corn to bison, narrow federal food-safety codes impact tribal food systems. But advocates are writing their own food laws to preserve Native food sovereignty.
Meet the Citizens Who Helped Decide Their City’s Budget—and Got Better Buses, Benches, and Crosswalks
by Ken Otterbourg
Greensboro, North Carolina, is the first Southern city to give citizens direct control over a slice of public spending.
Who’s Lobbying for Millennial Interests? Meet the “AARP for Young People”
by Araz Hachadourian
This is the first election year with the same number of millennial voters as baby boomers. Here’s how lobbyists for young people could change our politics on prisons, climate, and student debt.
With More Americans Going Far Left (And Right), an Anti-Corporate Agenda Takes Shape
by David Korten
Voters hit hardest by free-trade economics are rebelling against the status quo. We can use that energy to build a powerful, grassroots movement for democracy.
How Much Does It Cost to Win a Seat in the U.S. Senate?
by Keith Barbalato, Kate Stringer
And other things you should probably know.
Why Not Getting Married Is Smart Economics For Women
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
More people than ever before are choosing not to get married. And for women, that can actually be a good thing.
Choosing a President in a Time of Climate Crisis
by Sarah van Gelder
Our next president must be someone who understands the science of climate change and can build a clean energy future.
“Evil World Banking” Explained
by Yessenia Funes
In less than two minutes, John Perkins, author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, explains how corporations can take over entire nations through predatory loans and debt collection.
Why Give Breaks to Huge Corporations When We Could Invest Public Money Down the Street?
by Kasia Tarczynska
Cities and states fork over an estimated $70 billion each year to large companies that don’t need public assistance to thrive. We could spend that money on our own neighborhoods.
Why the Economy Should Stop Growing—And Just Grow Up
by David Korten
“How do we grow the economy?” is an obsolete question. Local initiatives across the world are looking for maturity instead as they rebuild caring, place-based communities and economies.
Immigration Is Not Just a Latino Thing. Here’s Why We Need Black Leaders
by Anshantia Oso
For years, the immigrant rights movement has been largely led by Latinos. Today, Black leadership is playing an increasingly important role in the grassroots fight to change U.S. immigration policy.
The Little-Known Farmworkers Who Sparked the Biggest Labor Movement In U.S. History
by Alexa Strabuk
There would be no Cesar Chavez without the Filipino manongs of Delano, California, whose decision to strike set off the most significant labor movement the United States has ever seen.