New Economy

Would Unconditional Basic Income Make Us Happier?
by Kira M. Newman
Some have questioned if the economy can function with a guaranteed minimum income. But few advocates or opponents have explored the policy’s impact on people’s emotional well-being.
Sanders Might Soon Be Out of the Race, But Not the Revolution
by Sarah van Gelder
Five ways to build on the momentum of the Bernie Sanders campaign and transform American politics in ways his supporters envisioned.
The Startup Turning Locals Into Entrepreneurs in Cincinnati’s Gentrifying Economy
by Araz Hachadourian
When neighborhoods develop, longtime residents are often left out of the boom. This incubator helps local entrepreneurs turn big ideas into businesses.
Why Economists Are Coming Out in Favor of Unconditional Basic Income
by Leslee Goodman
Economist Guy Standing says the policy can reverse inequality. It also has an invigorating effect on volunteerism, home ownership, and community strength.
A More Relevant and Radical Democratic Platform? Sanders Brings Veteran Activists to the Table
by Kate Stringer
From Cornel West to Bill McKibben, Sanders picks some heavy-hitting social movement leaders for the Democratic National Committee.
What If Trade Agreements Helped People, Not Corporations?
by David Korten
Current trade agreements have been of, by, and for transnational corporations. Growing opposition gives us the opportunity to change that in our next-generation agreements.
Immigrant Moms Were Told They Can’t Have Jobs—So They Started Their Own Tamale Co-op
by Travis Putnam Hill
Employment options can be extremely limited for undocumented immigrants who can’t work legally. These single moms are relying on each other.
Infographic: Where Legal Abortions Are Hardest to Get—and Who Lives There
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
Three maps show where restrictive abortion laws disproportionately affect low-income and African-American women.
As Boomers Retire, Mom-and-Pop Businesses Convert to Co-ops to Save Jobs
by Keli Tianga
Baby boomers are the largest percentage of business owners, and they’re headed toward retirement. Worker cooperatives could keep the jobs they’ve created from disappearing.
What the War on Reproductive Rights Has to do With Poverty and Race
by Renee Bracey Sherman
Forty years after Roe v. Wade, discourse about reproductive rights must acknowledge how crucial the abortion decision is to gender equity, economic stability, and a healthy life free from violence.
Amid Election Chaos, Communities Show Where the Real Power Is
by Sarah van Gelder
In every community I visited, I found people working hard to lay a different foundation for our society.
Tribes Create Their Own Food Laws to Stop USDA From Killing Native Food Economies
by Tristan Ahtone
From blue corn to bison, narrow federal food-safety codes impact tribal food systems. But advocates are writing their own food laws to preserve Native food sovereignty.
Meet the Citizens Who Helped Decide Their City’s Budget—and Got Better Buses, Benches, and Crosswalks
by Ken Otterbourg
Greensboro, North Carolina, is the first Southern city to give citizens direct control over a slice of public spending.
Who’s Lobbying for Millennial Interests? Meet the “AARP for Young People”
by Araz Hachadourian
This is the first election year with the same number of millennial voters as baby boomers. Here’s how lobbyists for young people could change our politics on prisons, climate, and student debt.
With More Americans Going Far Left (And Right), an Anti-Corporate Agenda Takes Shape
by David Korten
Voters hit hardest by free-trade economics are rebelling against the status quo. We can use that energy to build a powerful, grassroots movement for democracy.