New Economy

These Friends from High School Bought an Abandoned Factory. Now They're Distilling Artisanal Whiskeys‏
by Samuel Dolgin-Gardner
Much as blight can be contagious, so can renewal. How grassroots community groups are saving neighborhoods and building new businesses.
How to Become a Citizen Eater: A Trip Behind the Labels of Your Ethical Cup of Coffee
by Rachael Stoeve
Labels like "fair trade" and "direct trade" indicate food is ethically sourced—but how do you know what they really mean, and whether they're effective?
A March Madness Makeover: 5 Ways to Bring Fairness Into College Basketball
by Christopher Zumski Finke
March Madness is now a bigger cash cow than the Super Bowl, but in college sports the only people not getting a piece of the billion-dollar pie are the players.
7 Myths About Housewives, Debunked
by Lindsey Weedston
Are housewives less ambitious than career women? Are they bad feminists? Read on to go beyond the stereotypes.
What Does It Take to Start a Worker Co-Op? A Practical Video Guide to Democratizing Our Economy
by Laura Flanders
A new film asks whether practicing workplace democracy would be easier if our media gave us as many visions of collaboration as they do of competition?
What a Real-Life Rosie the Riveter Taught This Feminist Geek
by Lindsey Weedston
Before meeting Geraldine, I’d assumed that most of the women from the 1940s were unaware of how capable they were. I was wrong.
Laid-Off Baltimore Workers Beat Disney in Court—And Ask All the Right Questions About Urban Development
by Christina Arrison
By some estimates, the city of Baltimore has sunk more than $1.5 billion into its Inner Harbor. Workers and residents want their share too.
New Film Shows How Florida Farmworkers Won Fairer Pay From America's Biggest Food Companies
by Nur Lalji
"This is not a film about oppression," said Food Chains executive producer Eva Longoria. "It's actually about transformation."
How the U.S. Government Could End the Student Debt Crisis Today
by Raúl Carrillo
Instead of loaning students money, the federal government could just pay for their tuition, without causing any significant economic problems.
“We Couldn’t Possibly Be Poor”: How a Doctor Fell Into Poverty
by Robin Dickinson
“As we found ourselves choosing between rice, oatmeal, or potatoes for every meal, it occurred to us that being in poverty isn’t about how hard you work; it’s about how much money you make.”
Economists Who Say the Planet Has Infinite Resources Are Today’s Flat Earth Society
by Eric Zencey
The attempt to solve our ecological and social crises through economic growth is a fool’s task, because both crises have a common cause: an infinite-planet, perpetual-growth economy has met the limits of a finite planet.
When Poverty Was the Enemy, Not the Poor
by Tom Eblen
The poverty rate in the U.S. would be 15 percent higher if not for the War on Poverty and government anti-poverty programs since 1967.
Bangladeshi Workers Organize to Protect Their Most Valuable Export: Themselves
by Tiffany Williams
In the evolving global economy, migrants facing virtual indentured servitude abroad—and coming home to debt and social isolation—feels like the new normal.
Why a Tiny Decrease in Unemployment Means a Big Pay Raise for the Poor
by Dean Baker
A sustained one-percentage-point decline in the unemployment rate is associated with a 9.4 percent rise in the wages of workers in the bottom quintile of the wage distribution.
Workers in Maine Buy Out Their Jobs, Set an Example for the Nation
by Rob Brown, Noemi Giszpenc, Brian Van Slyke
For the new worker-owners of the Island Employee Cooperative, the transformation into a co-op will create profound changes in their lives.