New Economy

10 Reasons to Leave Your Company to Your Workers When You Retire
by Rob Brown
It’s a once-in-a-generation opportunity: Selling to employees can yield a better price, preserve a legacy, keep jobs and profits local—and maybe even eradicate inequality.
Video: How This Brooklyn Neighborhood is Putting Healthy Food in Business
by Liz Pleasant
A co-op training program in Brooklyn could serve as a model for other cities looking to combat the effects of gentrification for long-time residents.
Why Slower Money Is the Key to a Real Economic Recovery
by Keith Harrington
An exciting crop of organizations are financing businesses in a way that creates real wealth. Here are a few ways to scale them up so that they can truly challenge Wall Street.
Dangerous History: What the Story of Black Economic Cooperation Means for Us Today
by Keane Bhatt
African Americans have been pioneering co-ops as an economic strategy since the days of slavery. Author Jessica Gordon Nembhard on how centuries-old models can guide our economy today.
A Techy Management Fad Gives Workers More Power—Up to a Point
by Nathan Schneider
Holacracy aims to liberate workers from micromanagement by replacing bosses with code-like rules modeled on computer programming.
Own a Home in Just Four Years? This Co-Op Program Keeps Workers in the Neighborhood
by Yessenia Funes
Nearly half of Evergreen’s worker-owners have purchased homes through the program.
Why We Did an Issue on Debt
by James Trimarco, Christa Hillstrom
Good debts? We know it sounds crazy. But there’s a quiet revolution brewing in how we move money around, and we want our readers to know about it.
“Don’t Owe. Won’t Pay.” Everything You’ve Been Told About Debt Is Wrong
by Charles Eisenstein
With the nation’s household debt burden at $11.85 trillion, even the most modest challenges to its legitimacy have revolutionary implications.
Infographic: The Real Reason You Have So Much Debt (It’s Not Crazy Spending)
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn, Heidi Bruce
$11.85 trillion in household debt has more to do with stagnant wages (and predatory banks) than shopping sprees.
The Crunch: Why Washington D.C. Hired a Herd of Goats (And Other News to Chew On)
by YES! Staff
This week we’re talking about the future of work, a "masculine studies" program... and goats.
A North Carolina Textile Co-Op Gives Immigrant Workers a Stake in the Business
by Cecilia Garza
In a state that lost 88 percent of its textile industry jobs in just 10 years, small worker-owned cooperatives are islands of rights and resilience.
How Buying the Local Post Office Will Help My Family Farm and Small Town Survive
by Shannon Hayes
I never thought farming would mean owning a post office. But looking at my community and our need to define ourselves as a place, that seems to be our family farm's next job.
These Friends from High School Bought an Abandoned Factory. Now They're Distilling Artisanal Whiskeys‏
by Samuel Dolgin-Gardner
Much as blight can be contagious, so can renewal. How grassroots community groups are saving neighborhoods and building new businesses.
How to Become a Citizen Eater: A Trip Behind the Labels of Your Ethical Cup of Coffee
by Rachael Stoeve
Labels like "fair trade" and "direct trade" indicate food is ethically sourced—but how do you know what they really mean, and whether they're effective?
A March Madness Makeover: 5 Ways to Bring Fairness Into College Basketball
by Christopher Zumski Finke
March Madness is now a bigger cash cow than the Super Bowl, but in college sports the only people not getting a piece of the billion-dollar pie are the players.