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Work

Making a living, and a life.

If Unions Are Breaking Automakers, Why Are BMW and Mercedes So Rich? If Unions Are Breaking Automakers, Why Are BMW and Mercedes So Rich?
by Thom Hartmann
In Germany, auto workers get paid well and their companies still profit. Author Thom Hartmann on why living wages and corporate success don't have to be mutually exclusive.
Video: Inside America's Largest Worker-Owned Co-op Video: Inside America's Largest Worker-Owned Co-op
What does it take to keep a massive co-op growing? Find out in this video profile of the people behind Cooperative Health Care Associates.
How America's Largest Worker Owned Co-Op Lifts People Out of Poverty How America's Largest Worker Owned Co-Op Lifts People Out of Poverty
by Laura Flanders
Cooperative Home Care Associates' 2,300 workers enjoy good wages, regular hours, and family health insurance. With an investment of $1.2 million into the cooperative sector, New York City is hoping to build on the group's success.
Why Target Stopped Asking Job Applicants If They've Been Convicted of a Crime Why Target Stopped Asking Job Applicants If They've Been Convicted of a Crime
by Nur Lalji
More than 60 counties, cities, and states—and some corporations—are reducing discrimination against former offenders by removing one small box from job applications.
Seattle Wins $15 Minimum Wage—Will Your Town Be Next? Seattle Wins $15 Minimum Wage—Will Your Town Be Next?
by YES! Editors
Activists built support for the ordinance by demonstrating that it would reduce poverty in the city.
That Book About Inequality That's Sold Out of Bookstores? Here's What It Means for 2016 That Book About Inequality That's Sold Out of Bookstores? Here's What It Means for 2016
by John Feffer
The popularity of a new book by French economist Thomas Piketty should be a wake-up call for politicians. If inequality sells in the stores, it will sell at the polls as well.
The Coal Workers You Didn't Know Existed—And Why They May Be At Risk The Coal Workers You Didn't Know Existed—And Why They May Be At Risk
by Erin L. McCoy
Thousands of workers may be at risk of chronic disease from the chemicals used to process coal—including MCHM, which recently contaminated the drinking water of nearly 300,000 West Virginia residents.
Video: Can We Create Living-Wage Jobs for Everyone? Video: Can We Create Living-Wage Jobs for Everyone?
by Laura Flanders
We have plenty of low-income jobs, but fewer in the middle where we really need investment. How can we make sure public money is spent for the greater good?
A New Source of Jobs for India's Rural Women? (Hint: It's in Your Shampoo) A New Source of Jobs for India's Rural Women? (Hint: It's in Your Shampoo)
by Shilpi Chhotray
The business in chemicals extracted from seaweed—predicted to be worth $7 billion by 2018—is emerging as a source of employment for rural women.
Only 4 Percent of the Lowest-Wage Workers Get Paid Family Leave: Could a New Law Change This? Only 4 Percent of the Lowest-Wage Workers Get Paid Family Leave: Could a New Law Change This?
by Elizabeth Ben-Ishai
Many small businesses do want to give their workers paid time off to care for new babies and sick family members, but lack the means. How a new bill could make it possible.
How Domestic Workers Won Their Rights: Five Big Lessons How Domestic Workers Won Their Rights: Five Big Lessons
by Amy B. Dean
After decades of exclusion, home care workers are finally covered by federal minimum wage laws. Anyone who works for social change can learn from how they did it.
White House Makes History by Granting Minimum Wage to Home Care Workers White House Makes History by Granting Minimum Wage to Home Care Workers
by Christa Hillstrom
The Obama administration makes good on its promise to give direct care workers the same rights as nearly everyone else—and to top it all off, California follows suit.
Less than 2 Percent of Carpenters Are Women—Meet the Master Builder Working to Change That Less than 2 Percent of Carpenters Are Women—Meet the Master Builder Working to Change That
by Erika Lundahl
Maria Klemperer-Johnson is getting women ready for a growing and high-paying field by teaching them to build eco-friendly tiny homes.
Three Things Activists in the Office Can Learn from the Street Three Things Activists in the Office Can Learn from the Street
by Liam Barrington-Bush
Organizations working for social justice can become living examples of the world they're working to create, but only if they're willing to take the lessons of social movements to heart.
Escape from an L.A. Sweatshop: How Modern-Day Slaves Become Lobbyists Escape from an L.A. Sweatshop: How Modern-Day Slaves Become Lobbyists
by Christa Hillstrom
Lured from Mexico into forced labor at an American factory, Flor Molina’s human trafficking story was typical. What’s remarkable is what she did next.
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