Peace and Justice

Building “Political Power” for Black Americans Where Voter Suppression Is Highest
by Liza Bayless
This election will be the first in 50 years not to offer full protections under the Voting Rights Act of 1965. But the Movement for Black Lives is hopeful.
Who Deserves a Liberal Arts Degree? For Inmates, It’s a Way Out
by Liza Bayless
Obama's controversial pilot program will make higher education dollars available to inmates this year. Proponents hope it will build on the success private liberal arts programs are achieving in prisons across the country.
Divest From Prisons, Invest in People—What Justice for Black Lives Really Looks Like
by Liza Bayless
Instead of addressing the roots of drug addiction, mental illness, and poverty, we’ve come to accept policing and incarceration as catch-all solutions. It’s time for a change.
Meet the Ex-Inmate Whose Successful Prison Rehab Program Goes Beyond Drug Treatment

by Melissa Hellmann
As California reduces its prison population by tens of thousands, the TimeList Group’s unique approach to rehab keeps parolees from going back.
1 in 11 U.S. Gun Deaths Is at the Hands of Police. How Do We Stop the Killing?
by Arun Gupta
The documentary film “Peace Officer” explains the connection between the war on drugs and the militarization of police, and what it will take to reduce police violence in America.
Forget Nutraloaf—Prisoners Are Growing Their Own Food
by Marcus Harrison Green
From New York to California, prison gardening programs serve as cost-effective food sources and provide inmates with better nutrition.
Formerly Incarcerated Moms Fight for Reforms to Save Families
by Victoria Law
Two-thirds of women behind bars are mothers of children under the age of 18, and even a short stint in jail can cause them to lose their jobs, housing, and kids. Here are four policies to help prevent that.
40,000 Former Convicts in Maryland Just Got New Voting Rights. Here’s How It Happened
by Lynsi Burton
Just in time for this year’s presidential primary, a new law in Maryland will allow former offenders on probation or parole the right to vote.
24 States Put Juvenile Offenders in Solitary, But Advocates Are Trying to Change That
by Marcus Harrison Green
Studies show kids held in solitary confinement experience long-lasting psychological damage. Activists hope a wave of local and national policy changes means widespread reform is on the way.
Anti-Racist Organizers Win as Seattle Council Votes to End Youth Incarceration
by Marcus Harrison Green
The resolution, which passed unanimously, endorses the goal of having no kids in detention in Seattle. It’s a move that chips away at the school-to-prison pipeline.
Video: A Brief History of the Mass Incarceration of Black Americans
by Liz Pleasant
One in every three African American men will be sent to prison in their lifetime. In this video, Ta-Nehisi Coates discusses how so many black Americans get trapped behind bars.
The US Has Spent $14B on Community Policing—What Have We Learned So Far?
by Christopher Moraff
Gauging whether a community policing program has been successful ultimately depends on how you define success.
Can Money Help Shrink Jail Populations? The MacArthur Foundation Is Betting $75M on It
by Puck Lo
The grants will help jail systems develop a plan for eliminating “the overuse and misuse of jails.” But prisoner advocate Dan Berger says this doesn’t address larger issues like police bias and racism.
Kids on Chicago’s West Side Break the School-to-Prison Pipeline with Restorative Circles
by Maya Schenwar
For these Chicago students, restorative justice isn’t just about causing less harm to those around us. It’s also about actively creating safety, on their own terms.
Mentally Ill People Often Face Violence From Police—But These Cities Are Trying to Fix That
by Daniel Ross
Crisis Intervention Teams train police officers to understand mental illness without resorting to violence.