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Dave Moore: Fighter for Civil Rights and Working People

A tribute to Dave Moore, an icon of the civil rights and labor movements, who passed away in fall of 2009 at the age of 97.
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davemoore.jpgThis video celebrates the life of Dave Moore, a community activist, union organizer, and fighter for civil rights and working people. Born on April 6, 1912, in South Carolina, Moore and his family moved to Detroit when he was young. He became involved in union organizing workers and helped organize the Ford hunger march in 1932. The march turned violent, and five men were shot. The event "made me a changed man," Moore said, who now questioned "the so-called leaders of our government."

"I saw the hunger, despair, suffering, and it changed me. It changed me and my thinking."

Moore was later hired at Ford and led a walkout that was instrumental in organizing the workers. Soon after, the National Negro Labor Council was formed, and Moore was instrumental in the 1951 founding convention in Cleveland. Workers picketed American Airlines offices for three days until a delegation, which included Moore, was called in to speak to the American Airlines president.

The video alternates between historical photographs and interviews with Moore as it recounts his life story. USA Today concluded: "It is hard to find key labor issues in the first half of the 20th century that this 96-year-old African-American United Auto Workers union icon was not directly involved in or affected by."


Interview conducted by Dave Elsila. Video produced by Elsila, Bob Ingalls, and Al Benchich.

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