Peace and Justice

Dryhootch: A Milwaukee Coffeeshop Where Vets Help Vets Survive—At Home
by Ricardo Torres
Returning vets often struggle with relationships, housing, PTSD, and more. Dryhootch founders say the best mentors for people returning from our latest wars are other vets who have been through it before.
How a Small California Town Curbed a Teen Suicide Epidemic—By Talking About It
by Jane Braxton Little
Suicide is the fourth leading cause of death for 10- to 14-year-olds in rural America, and Native American kids are hit the hardest. After Indian Valley lost its sixth teenager, residents started talking about suicide out in the open—and it's working.
The Nairobi Mall Attack: Let’s Give Our Boys Something Better to Be a Part Of
by Simon Okelo
When the Westgate Mall was attacked by a terrorist group that aggressively recruits young men, one Kenyan asked—how can we respond to the pain and vulnerability of our boys before groups like Al-Shabab can reach them?
The Mass Shooting That Didn't Happen: Averting Violence with Kindness
by Aqualus Gordon
What can we do to help men like Aaron Alexis, the Navy Yard shooter, find another way to deal with their trauma? The story of Michael Hill suggests that kindness is part of the answer.
Women Are Vets, Too: Meet the Organization that Acts Like It
by Rachael Stoeve
At events known as "Stand Downs," which take place in more than 200 cities and towns across the United States, vets from all walks of life gather to support one another.
The Healing Journey of a Daughter of Slavery and a Son of the Slave Trade
by Lisa Gale Garrigues
Why an African American marketing consultant and a white writer took a journey to explore the effects of slavery, racism, and privilege.
Slave and Slaveholder Descendants Break Free of History's Trauma—Together
by Lisa Gale Garrigues
Responding to past traumas like slavery and acts of terrorism can heal us—and future generations.
Florida Occupation Digs in after Meeting with Governor Scott Turns Sour
by James Trimarco
The association says it will bring in retired members in an effort to defuse tensions between young occupiers and capitol police.
100 Young Black Activists Respond to George Zimmerman’s Acquittal
by Jamilah King
The statement, by the Black Youth Project, conveys profound sorrow along with a commitment to hold on to hope.
Want Justice for Trayvon? Start by Turning to Your Neighbors
by Sarah van Gelder
Your community is the perfect place to begin healing the wounds of racism.
Could Our Deepest Fears Hold the Key to Ending Violence?
by Frances Moore Lappe
Feelings of fear and powerlessness are driving the cycle of violence that surrounds us. To change that, we need to recognize that we need each other to thrive as individuals.
Me Too: A Letter to Steubenville’s Jane Doe
by Kim Simon
After her essay on raising boys to respect women went viral, an incredible outpouring of support gave author Kim Simon the courage to tell the story she really wanted to share: how her own healing from rape came from knowing she wasn’t alone.
Teaching Emotions: A Different Approach to Ending School Violence
by Katherine Gustafson
A growing network of programs is teaching kids how to understand and express their emotions. Among their results: decreased aggression and violence.
Dancing the World into Being: A Conversation with Idle No More’s Leanne Simpson
by Naomi Klein
Naomi Klein speaks with writer, spoken-word artist, and indigenous academic Leanne Betasamosake Simpson about “extractivism,” why it’s important to talk about memories of the land, and what’s next for Idle No More.
Global Day of Dance Connects Women around the Globe
by Katrina Rabeler
Eve Ensler’s One Billion Rising brought women into the streets in every country registered with the United Nations, plus a few places that aren’t. At the Seattle event, a dancing little girl seemed to represent the movement’s hopes for women’s lives.