Peace and Justice

This Syrian Band Played Its First European Gig in a Refugee Camp. Now It’s Going on Tour
by Rebecca Collard
When the members of Khebez Dawle fled Syria, they never expected they’d soon be playing sold out shows across Europe. 
Police Shooting Data Reveal New Tactics and Training Will Only Go So Far
by Nirej Sekhon
To create meaningful change, we must look beyond high-profile cases and ask why certain police-civilian encounters occur at all.
Life in the World’s Largest Refugee Camp
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Along the Kenya-Somalia border, people have been displaced for decades. A new book profiles nine Somali refugees to explain the political forces that keep them—and hundreds of thousands more—from getting out.
The Middle Eastern TV Show Bringing Feminist Views on Marriage to 80 Million People
by Lindsey Weedston
In Turkey, a soap opera is informing women of their rights and challenging cultural assumptions about marriage.
In a Tiny House Village, Portland's Homeless Find Dignity
by Marcus Harrison Green
As cities search for solutions to homelessness, Portland’s Dignity Village offers 60 men and women community and safety.
New York’s “Carwasheros” Push for Safer, Fairer Workplaces
by Jean Stevens
Car washes are the “wild, wild West” of workplace regulation. The Car Wash Accountability Act will improve that—if it is ever implemented.
Our Continued March to the Mountaintop
by Marcus Harrison Green
In his speech delivered in Seattle, YES! reporter Marcus Harrison Green acknowledges that realizing King’s dream will require more than kind words and promises.
Why Are Bathrooms the Place to Air Our Politics?
by Joe Scott
From issues of gender-bullying to discrimination against homeless people, safe and reliable bathroom access is a hot political topic these days.
How Filipina Beauty Queens Are Lobbying for Trans Rights
by Lindsey Weedston
In the first episode of their new documentary series, A Woman's Place, filmmakers explain how transgender beauty queens are lobbying for their rights outside of pageants.
Standing With Malala: Meet the Teenagers Who Survived the Taliban and Kept Going to School
by Jing Fong, Araz Hachadourian
In the Taliban assassination attempt on Malala Yousafzai, Shazia Ramzan, and Kainat Riaz were also shot—for no more than daring to go to school. Three years later, they’re more committed to education than ever.
8 Amazing Muslim Women Who Would Be Banned From Trump’s America (and Other News to Chew On)
by YES! Staff
The inner lives of drone operators, refugee camps through the eyes of children, and women who would be denied entry to the United States under Donald Trump’s “total shutdown.”
Why We Need More Shame-Free TV Characters Who Reflect the Reality of Abortion
by Jessica Gentile
The internet has been buzzing about Olivia Pope’s abortion on ABC’s Scandal. If nearly one-third of American women have an abortion by age 45, why don’t we see more female characters make the same decision?
In Photos: Minnesotans Face Gunfire and Cold in 11-Day Occupation of Police Precinct
by Christopher Zumski Finke
In Minneapolis, demonstrators are demanding police release video of a fatal shooting of an African-American man. Earlier this week, five were shot by alleged white supremacists.
My Mom Fled War Too: Finding Compassion for Syrian Refugees
by Yessenia Funes
Like refugees everywhere, my mom gave her children the gift of a better life—and an understanding of what it means to risk everything for it.
After Ferguson Uprising, Should St. Louis Spend $1 Billion on a New Football Stadium?
by Kate Aronoff
Just a year and a half after the St. Louis area became internationally known for racism, the city is considering building a billion-dollar stadium. If justice was our priority, says organizer Julia Ho, those tax dollars would be spent very differently.