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Human Rights

Dignity and freedom for all.

Indigenous Power: Indigenous Rights Go Global Indigenous Power: Indigenous Rights Go Global
by John Mohawk
Indigenous peoples are asserting their moral right to live as distinct communities and reminding us of the power of cooperation with nature.
Active Nonviolence: Heroes for an Unheroic Time Active Nonviolence: Heroes for an Unheroic Time
by Carol Estes
A nonviolent army stands fast, watching over human rights in the midst of conflict, a model of courageous peace.
New Orleans Forgotten New Orleans Forgotten
by Barbara Sehr
Months after Katrina, the displaced citizens of New Orleans march on City Hall and make demands on local, state, and federal governments.
Shelter from the Storm: an interview with Reverend Lee T. Wesley Shelter from the Storm: an interview with Reverend Lee T. Wesley
by Dee Axelrod
For the Reverend Lee T. Wesley, whose Baton Rouge congregation helped shelter 500 displaced New Orleans residents, the flood washed up more than the detritus of a city. The receding waters revealed hard truths about poverty and racism. YES! senior editor Dee Axelrod spoke with him by phone at his Community Bible Baptist Church.
The Green Belt Movement :: The Story of Wangari Maathai
by Mia MacDonald
Wangari Maathai, founder of Kenya's Green Belt Movement, recently won the Nobel Peace Prize. Her message: Peace is founded in healthy ecosystems, access to natural resources, and democracy.
Insisting on Peace in Colombia
by Bill Weinberg
The indigenous peoples, peasants, and urban youth of Colombia are declaring themselves off limits to the region's longest running war.
Spare the Rod
by Riane Eisler
It's not coincidental that throughout history the most violently despotic and warlike societies have been those in which violence, or the threat of violence, is used to maintain domination of parent over child and man over woman.
A Coalition for Survival
by Loretta Ross interviewed by Carolyn McConnell
One of the most unreported stories this year was the March for Women’s Lives, which brought over a million people to the streets of the nation’s capital. Even less reported was that women of color played a leading role in the event’s success.
Mother of Exiles
by Pramila Jayapal
In the U.S. today, immigrants are taking the blame for everything from environmental stresses to terrorism to the poor job market. What’s at stake for all of us in this debate?
Etiquette for Activists Etiquette for Activists
by Michael F. Leonen
Why do so many attempts to build coalitions across race and culture result in hurt and division? These seasoned activists offer tips on what makes the difference between success and disaster.
Debating Hate Debating Hate
by Thomas Simon
UNC students debate with Pastor Fred Phelps and his anti-gay views.
Iraqi Americans Face FBI Inquiries
by Pramila Jayapal
U.S. Justice Department and FBI interview immigrants.
Second Chance For Black Farmers
by Carol Estes
A recent class-action suit by black farmers against the USDA fails to stem the loss of land by African American farmers.
Martin Luther King's Movement-Building Legacy Martin Luther King's Movement-Building Legacy
by Grace Lee Boggs
The struggle goes far beyond race and rights. We are in the early stages of a new democratic revolutionary movement.
Veterans of Hope: Ruby Sales
by Ruby Sales
In this Veterans of Hope interview, Ruby Sales tells of her release from prison in Haneyville, Alabama, where she and Jonathan Daniels, a white seminarian, had been registering people to vote.
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