Peace and Justice

When the Police Came, I Didn’t Risk Arrest. So What Was My Role at the Break Free Climate Action?
by Erika Lundahl
I had held at bay the question of whether I wanted to participate in direct action. But I also knew it was the heartbeat of this diverse movement.
This “New” Feminism Has Been Here All Along
by Dani McClain
Our grandmothers showed us a bigger, better feminism with women’s rights, racial equity, and gender justice at its heart.
Why Progressives Need a Strong Republican Party—and What Republicans of Color Are Doing to Save It
by Marcus Harrison Green
A one-party democracy is no democracy at all. Meet the new generation of Republicans working to bring their party back to life and into the 21st century.
It’s Not Really About Bathrooms: Why the Trans Fight is About Human Rights
by Eesha Pandit
What can counter the hate-filled narratives that are surrounding equal rights ordinance campaigns? The LGBT movement and its allies must amplify and center the voices of Transgender people.
“They” and the Emotional Weight of Words
by Cole
Even in the smallest of interactions—like how we use pronouns—we can create connections that allow us to challenge one another on our assumptions about gender.
“Evil World Banking” Explained
by Yessenia Funes
In less than two minutes, John Perkins, author of Confessions of an Economic Hit Man, explains how corporations can take over entire nations through predatory loans and debt collection.
The Next Libyan Revolution Will Be Led by Women Wielding Words—Not Guns
by Alaa Murabit
“Soft power” gives communities words and tools to fight against violence, fear, and corruption and offers youth weapons of peace against an enemy that wants to drag them into war.
Why the Economy Should Stop Growing—And Just Grow Up
by David Korten
“How do we grow the economy?” is an obsolete question. Local initiatives across the world are looking for maturity instead as they rebuild caring, place-based communities and economies.
Immigration Is Not Just a Latino Thing. Here’s Why We Need Black Leaders
by Anshantia Oso
For years, the immigrant rights movement has been largely led by Latinos. Today, Black leadership is playing an increasingly important role in the grassroots fight to change U.S. immigration policy.
The Tiny House Village Holding a Family Together
by Viola Gaskell
A tiny house complex in Seattle shows what it can do for homeless families by helping one couple raise their baby together under one (very small) roof.
The Little-Known Farmworkers Who Sparked the Biggest Labor Movement In U.S. History
by Alexa Strabuk
There would be no Cesar Chavez without the Filipino manongs of Delano, California, whose decision to strike set off the most significant labor movement the United States has ever seen.
How Can Southern States Increase Voter Access for Black Residents After DMV Closures?
by YES! Staff
When DMV closures threatened Black voter access in Alabama, the government launched a traveling ID service. But is it enough?
Beyond the NFL: A New Plan to Treat Brain Injuries For Women Escaping Abuse
by Reagan Jackson
Unlike players in the NFL, women who struggle with lifelong effects of concussions from abuse are rarely diagnosed. In Phoenix, scientists and advocates are working to change that.
Still Saying YES!—20 Years of Solutions Journalism
by Sarah van Gelder
Like many startups, YES! Magazine began with an energized small team, an idea we thought important, and a basement office. Twenty years later, we're stronger than ever.
What Small Farms Need to Compete With Corporate Food
by Kate Stringer
Most small farms have to follow the same rules as big corporate ones. In Maine, flexible food ordinances have increased the number of small farmers.