Peace and Justice

Ethnic Studies Courses Break Down Barriers and Benefit Everyone—So Why the Resistance?
by J. Gabriel Ware
As cities incorporate curricula that deconstruct stereotypes and negative assumptions about race, advocates say everyone wins. Others argue they just promote resentment.
The Superrich Have Profited From a Broken System—And Their Money Alone Won’t Fix It
by David Korten
Giving back requires humility. It will be a true test of learning new skills.
Make-or-Break Moment for Health Care as GOP Scrambles for 216 Votes
by Mark Trahant
Trump has gone to Congress to make his case for Paul Ryan’s plan, but polls show the Affordable Care Act is still more popular.
How Chicago Became the First City to Make Reparations to Victims of Police Violence
by Yana Kunichoff, Sarah Macaraeg
The ordinance provides a meaningful model for creating reparations at the local level.
What Grace Lee Boggs Would’ve Taught Activists in This Moment
by Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu
Three principles to help you avoid burnout and continue working toward a better world.
Minnesota Churches Face Tough Questions in Offering Sanctuary to Immigrants
by Christopher Zumski Finke
For these churches, giving protection to immigrants is no longer a matter of if, but when. And what will happen if ICE comes to their doors?
I Am Your Negro Sometimes
by Terrance Hayes
Poet Terrance Hayes on the James Baldwin documentary: “It seemed, for a moment, we had come around a big bend on the racial mountain. It seemed, for a moment, we were beyond Negro.”
Small-Scale Farming Could Restore America’s Rural Towns
by Sarah van Gelder
Although many people in these struggling regions voted for the new president, his cynical answers will not bring them prosperity. But I saw what could.
Trying to Be a Proud Latina When People Prefer Whiteness—Even in My Mother’s Homeland
by Stephanie Jimenez
For people of color to be seen as fully American, we are often forced to denounce parts of our identities.
This Is the Real Success Story of the Affordable Care Act
by Mark Trahant
Government-sponsored Medicaid and Medicare are efficient and reliable—and already cover 36 percent of Americans.
What DNA Ancestry Testing Can (and Can’t) Tell You
by Zenobia Jeffries
The social justice implications of spitting into a test tube.
This Invention Lets Rural Hondurans Clean Their Water—And Own the Treatment Plants
by Carrie Koplinka-Loehr
What’s at stake in a world where science is marginalized? Programs like AguaClara, which offer sustainable, low-cost solutions to communities in need.
Defunding Police—How Antiracist Organizers Got Seattle to Listen
by Melissa Hellmann
By halting a proposed $150 million police precinct, Seattle activists have made headway in redirecting funding toward services like affordable housing and education.
Why Defending Human Rights Is Women’s Work
by Rucha Chitnis
“It is important to celebrate these women who are building a more peaceful world that is open, just, and filled with love.”
The Refugee Crisis Is a Sign of a Planet in Trouble
by David Korten
We must shift the structures of society to ensure the Earth remains healthy and everyone has access to a decent livelihood.