Peace and Justice

His Ancestors Were Slave Traders and Hers Were Slaves. What They Learned About Healing from a Roadtrip
by Sharon Leslie Morgan, Thomas Norman DeWolf
We embarked upon a journey to test whether two people —could come to grips with deep, traumatic, historic wounds and find healing. We had no idea where we would end up.
Audio: Desmond Tutu and His Daughter Mpho On How the U.S. Can Heal From Racial Wounds
by Sarah van Gelder, Fania Davis, Miles Schneiderman
The father and daughter recently published The Book of Forgiving, a guide to help perpetrators and victims embrace their mutual humanity.
Chicago Just Became the First U.S. City to Pay Reparations to Victims of Police Torture
by Araz Hachadourian
For nearly 20 years, officers of the Chicago Police Department tortured more than 100 people. How survivors and their lawyers won a decades-long fight.
What If Your Hometown Became "America's Rape Capital"?
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Missoula has a problem—just like every college town in America. A sociologist weighs in on Jon Krakauer's new book about sexual assault at the University of Montana.
How Lynching Shaped American History—From the Old South to Modern Prisons
by Liz Pleasant
For Bryan Stevensen, the largest evil surrounding African-American history isn’t slavery, but the pervasiveness of white supremacy and the difficulty we have discussing it openly.
You’ve Heard What’s Wrong in Freddie Gray’s Neighborhood. Here’s One Local’s Vision for Turning That Around
by Mary Hansen
Blaize Connelly-Duggan’s vision for the neighborhood is all about community ownership and development without displacement.
These Moms Lost Their Kids to Violence. On Mother's Day Weekend, They're Marching on Washington‏
by Araz Hachadourian, Mary Hansen
Maria Hamilton's son Dontre was killed by police officers. After no one was charged, she sought out hundreds of other parents and decided to take their demands to Washington.
Young Guatemalan Farmers Fight For Land Rights, Local Food, and Sustainable Traditions Endangered by Global Trade Deals‏
by Jeff Abbott
The same forces that have driven many onto the migrant trail have led to the emergence of a movement of young campesinos organizing to stay on their land.
Baltimoreans Celebrate Charging of Officers—But Say It’s Just First Step
by Mary Hansen, Araz Hachadourian
“It’s not ‘game over,’ it’s ‘game on.’ Now, we can actually start to see things happening.”
Photos: Baltimore Protests Inspire Renewed Sense of Direction For Community Leaders‏
by Cecilia Garza, Mary Hansen
“If people are calling for peace, we need to push the narrative toward policies and political changes that are actually going to give people the conditions to deal with structural violence.”
One of These 4 Radical, Badass Women Could Be on the $20 Bill
by Lindsey Weedston
Until May 10, Americans will vote on Rosa Parks, Harriet Tubman, and two other contenders to replace Andrew Jackson.
State of Emergency—Meet the Everyday People Demanding Justice on Baltimore Streets
by Liz Pleasant
Video: City council members, religious leaders, and community activists continue to ask Baltimore police be held accountable for Freddie Gray's death.
"Freddie Gray Used to Buy Me Ice Cream"—Voices From the Streets of Baltimore
by Liz Pleasant
After 25-year-old Freddie Gray died from injuries sustained in a Baltimore police van, city residents are rallying to demand accountability.
Armenia’s Genocide Began 100 Years Ago Today. Here’s How the World Remembered It
by Araz Hachadourian
If you could see my Facebook feed right now, you would understand how much this day means to Armenians like me.
From Watersheds to Mountains, What If We Based Our Borders on Nature?
by Rachael Stoeve
Bioregionalism is one possible vision of a future that works for people and for the Earth.