Peace and Justice

What Is It Like to Live Without Running Water? Detroit Families Know
by Zenobia Jeffries
A recent study predicts that in the next five years, more than one-third of Americans will not be able to afford their water.
What a Policy of Real Solidarity With the Syrian People Looks Like
by James Trimarco
The U.S. does not have to choose between backing the Assad regime or extremist groups. There is another choice: Syria’s homegrown pro-democracy resistance.
The Kendall Jenner Pepsi Memes Made You a Better Person. Think About It
by Ambreia Meadows-Fernandez
Those cleverly captioned photos shared on social media can spark conversations and help build empathy.
Why These Missile Strikes Won’t Make Things Better for the Syrian People
by Stephen Zunes
There are serious questions as to whether Trump’s bombing of the Syrian base has anything to do with protecting civilians.
CEOs Now Make 300 Times More Than Their Workers. This City Is Putting a Stop to That
by Chuck Collins
Runaway CEO pay contributes to income inequality and ultimately harms companies, so local governments aren’t waiting for a federal fix.
Portland Public Schools First to Put Global Climate Justice in Classroom
by Melissa Hellmann
Students learn about the front lines of global warming and how to be climate activists.
Monet Wins Tobenkin Award for Standing Rock Coverage
by YES! staff
“At their heart, her stories were about the religious freedom, sovereignty, and human rights sought by Indigenous people everywhere.”
Wildfires Are Essential: The Forest Service Embraces a Tribal Tradition
by Nathan Gilles
The Karuk were once denied the right to practice an ancient tradition. Now scientific and resource management circles are seeing the merits of controlled burning.
Incarcerating US: The Failings of America’s Prison System
by Kim Eckart
The documentary dates the problem to the war on drugs and the establishment of mandatory minimum sentences.
Seattle Is Sixth Local Government to Sue Trump Over Threats to Sanctuary Cities
by James Trimarco
“Sanctuary policies are legal, and Trump’s executive order is not.”
Photo Essay: These Sculptures Tell the Story of the First Japanese Americans Sent to Camps
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
The memorial wall is 276 feet long—one foot for every Japanese person who lived on Bainbridge Island in 1942.
How a Faculty Fast Pushed a University to Finally Denounce Trump’s Travel Ban
by Will Meyer
In South Carolina, a university president’s middle-of-the-road response to the executive order sparked a string of campuswide resistance efforts to protect the rights of international students.
Rosie the Riveter for the 21st Century: You Dreamed, We Drew
by Jennifer Luxton
Readers submitted their ideas for updating the classic icon. See the winning poster ideas—and download your favorites.
The West Coast Will Determine the Fate of the Fossil Fuel Industry
by Arun Gupta
All along the Pacific Coast, environmentalists are gearing up for an epic fight.
Ethnic Studies Courses Break Down Barriers and Benefit Everyone—So Why the Resistance?
by J. Gabriel Ware
As cities incorporate curricula that deconstruct stereotypes and negative assumptions about race, advocates say everyone wins. Others argue they just promote resentment.