Peace and Justice

“Equal Play, Equal Pay”: Female Athletes Play for Respect in Rio
by Liza Bayless
The U.S. national women’s soccer team has won far more championships than the U.S. men’s team. So why are they paid less?
The Surprise Weapon in Detroit’s Battle Against Gentrification
by Steve Furay
The Illuminate Literacy project encourages neighborhood youth to hold onto their identities and histories by expressing themselves in words.
The Fifth-Graders Who Put Mexican Repatriation Back Into History Books
by Lani Cupchoy
When a California history class noticed the U.S. 1930s Mexican Repatriation had been left out of the curriculum, they decided to take it up with the state Legislature.
Meet the Ex-Inmate Whose Successful Prison Rehab Program Goes Beyond Drug Treatment

by Melissa Hellmann
As California reduces its prison population by tens of thousands, the TimeList Group’s unique approach to rehab keeps parolees from going back.
Thousands Moving Money to Black-Owned Banks
by Zenobia Jeffries
The latest response to discrimination and police brutality is renewed calls to #BankBlack and bring economic empowerment to struggling communities.
New Voting App Aims to Improve Turnout of Young Latinos
by Liza Bayless
With 4 million more Latinos eligible to vote in 2016, Unidos brings news and information to a group that could play a major role in the 2016 elections.
Why We Need to See Those Videos of Police Brutality
by Bill Buzenberg
Outrage over videos of violent injustice will help spark deep social change.
This Presidential Race Is a Clear Choice: Fight, Flight, or Fellowship
by David Korten
Will we respond to Trump’s appeal to the reptilian brain or choose Clinton’s call to our higher nature?
How We Report on Structural Racism Can Hurt Us—or Heal Us
by Zenobia Jeffries
Too many headlines and stories right now are contributing to a polarized society, but media could instead play an important role in revealing our shared humanity.
A Political Turning Point for Native Americans
by Mark Trahant
Who will be Indian Country’s Obama? Look to the states. Her name will be Paulette, Peggy, or Denise.
Native Candidates Make a Historic Push for Congress
by Michael J. Dax
As the presidential race has demonstrated, 2016 is the year for outsiders, and no group can be considered further from the establishment than Native Americans.
Why Hope Has Power in This Gut-Wrenching Election Year
by Frances Moore Lappé, Adam Eichen
Cynicism and despair are among democracy’s worst enemies.
After the Violence and Videos, Therapists Learn to Treat Racial Trauma
by Jaime Alfaro
From specialized clinics for African Americans to social media events that take the shame out of sharing, there's a movement to heal the psychological scars of racism.
#WallOffTrump: How Humor Defied Racism at the RNC
by Alexa Mills
Laughter makes us feel safer, stronger, and more together. In Cleveland, activists used it to flip Trump's own ridiculous words upside down.
After Weeks of Tragedy, Possibilities Will Emerge
by Sarah van Gelder
The one thing we can count on is change. But what will make that change inclusive and sustainable instead of violent and fascistic?