Peace and Justice

How to Become a Citizen Eater: A Trip Behind the Labels of Your Ethical Cup of Coffee
by Rachael Stoeve
Labels like "fair trade" and "direct trade" indicate food is ethically sourced—but how do you know what they really mean, and whether they're effective?
When the Grandmothers Awoke
by Jennifer Browdy
Becoming a global family, one that unites ancient indigenous wisdom with other faith and cultural traditions, is essential if humanity is to overcome the crises of climate change.
From Warrior Cops to Community Police: A Former Chief on How We Can Turn Back the Tide of Militarization
by Norm Stamper
Police in America belong to the people—not the other way around. Former Seattle police Chief Norm Stamper on how we can turn militarized cops into neighborhood-oriented officers, responsive to community needs.
The Largest Chinese Bike Share Program Is 12 Times the Size of NYC’s
by Miles Schneiderman, Peter D'Auria
(And 22 other numbers that will help you understand our world).
Is the Maker Movement About Hacking Society—Or Just Hardware?
by Kayla Schultz
At feminist hackerspaces, members are less interested in digital trespassing than in developing a safe community for experimenting, creating, and collaborating.
Will the Elder Boom Spur a Caring Revolution? Ai-jen Poo’s Inspiring Vision
by Wendy Lustbader
We need to shift the stories we tell ourselves about the value of elders, the care they need, and later life itself.
Deep in the Amazon, a Tiny Tribe Is Beating Big Oil
by David Goodman
The people of Sarayaku are a leading force in 21st century indigenous resistance, engaging the western world politically, legally, and philosophically.
Alaska Bolstered Its Economy and Curbed Inequality—By Paying Everyone Thousands in Oil Dividends Every Year
by Peter Barnes
After 30 years, the practice of paying every resident—including children—at least $1,000 has made Alaska one of the least unequal states in America. Here's what the rest of us can learn.
These Gorgeous Photographs Show Indigenous Americans Without the Stereotypes
by Natasha Donovan
Three years ago, Matika Wilbur set out on an ambitious undertaking: a vast road trip across America to photograph members of all 562 of America’s federally-recognized tribes.
Radical Farmers Use Fresh Food to Fight Racial Injustice and the New Jim Crow
by Leah Penniman
If we are to create a society that values black life, we cannot ignore the role of food and land.
“Selma”: A Beautifully Shot Film Shows How Change Really Happens
by Kate Aronoff
Neither a “great man” history of Martin Luther King Jr., nor a tale of forgotten underdogs, Selma is about skilled activists building a movement.
A Baltimore Public School Teacher Explains Why It Pays to Put Kids in Control
by Andy Lee Roth
What do Shakespeare’s plays tell us about how to run classrooms in an unequal society?
How #FergusonSyllabus Helps Teachers Discuss Police, Racism, and History
by Liz Pleasant
“Teachers are better prepared because #FergusonSyllabus created a space for exchange among educators about best practices and materials for illustrating the best and worst of our democracy.”
Can Empathy for Birds Make Us Happier? Ten Breakthroughs in the Science of a Meaningful Life
by Jeremy Adam Smith, Bianca Lorenz, Kira M. Newman, Lauren Klein, Lisa Bennett, Jason Marsh, Jill Suttie
Last year, scientists found that gratitude makes us financially smarter, mindfulness reduces racism, a little sadness makes for healthier people, and compassion for birds could help tackle climate change.
Restorative Justice at Work: How This Indigenous Wood Carver Is Finding Peace After a Seattle Officer Killed His Brother
by Kayla Schultz
Rick Williams asked for calm when protesters demanded justice for his brother, who was shot and killed by a Seattle police officer. But he realizes that "the only way you can help change the system is show them you are a human being."