Peace and Justice

Solar Panels Are Part of the Pope’s Revolution—But So Is Dismantling Structural Racism
by Anthony Giancatarino
The Pope is talking about a revolution that goes way beyond simply adding renewable energy to our current extractive economy.
Two Things White People Should Never Say
by Robert Jensen
“I’m not racist, but...” and other things to avoid saying when talking about race.
Can Money Help Shrink Jail Populations? The MacArthur Foundation Is Betting $75M on It
by Puck Lo
The grants will help jail systems develop a plan for eliminating “the overuse and misuse of jails.” But prisoner advocate Dan Berger says this doesn’t address larger issues like police bias and racism.
150 Years Later, Two Universities Answer for Their Founder's Role in the Sand Creek Massacre
by Ned Blackhawk
Under pressure from students and community members, Northwestern University and University of Denver take the first steps towards righting historic wrongs.
Is Populism Making a Comeback? What You Need to Know About Its History—And Its Future
by Fran Korten
The 19th century populists gave us co-ops and workers' rights. Here's how we can build on their work to solve 21st century problems.
Can America Heal After Ferguson? We Asked Desmond Tutu and His Daughter
by Fania Davis, Sarah van Gelder
South Africans surprised everyone by transitioning to a relatively peaceful post-apartheid society. Here’s what Americans can learn.
Ireland Votes to Legalize Gay Marriage
by Liz Pleasant
Ireland makes history by legalizing gay marriage—reminding people that change is possible.
His Ancestors Were Slave Traders and Hers Were Slaves. What They Learned About Healing from a Roadtrip
by Sharon Leslie Morgan, Thomas Norman DeWolf
We embarked upon a journey to test whether two people —could come to grips with deep, traumatic, historic wounds and find healing. We had no idea where we would end up.
Audio: Desmond Tutu and His Daughter Mpho On How the U.S. Can Heal From Racial Wounds
by Sarah van Gelder, Fania Davis, Miles Schneiderman
The father and daughter recently published The Book of Forgiving, a guide to help perpetrators and victims embrace their mutual humanity.
Chicago Just Became the First U.S. City to Pay Reparations to Victims of Police Torture
by Araz Hachadourian
For nearly 20 years, officers of the Chicago Police Department tortured more than 100 people. How survivors and their lawyers won a decades-long fight.
What If Your Hometown Became "America's Rape Capital"?
by Christopher Zumski Finke
Missoula has a problem—just like every college town in America. A sociologist weighs in on Jon Krakauer's new book about sexual assault at the University of Montana.
How Lynching Shaped American History—From the Old South to Modern Prisons
by Liz Pleasant
For Bryan Stevensen, the largest evil surrounding African-American history isn’t slavery, but the pervasiveness of white supremacy and the difficulty we have discussing it openly.
You’ve Heard What’s Wrong in Freddie Gray’s Neighborhood. Here’s One Local’s Vision for Turning That Around
by Mary Hansen
Blaize Connelly-Duggan’s vision for the neighborhood is all about community ownership and development without displacement.
These Moms Lost Their Kids to Violence. On Mother's Day Weekend, They're Marching on Washington‏
by Araz Hachadourian, Mary Hansen
Maria Hamilton's son Dontre was killed by police officers. After no one was charged, she sought out hundreds of other parents and decided to take their demands to Washington.
Young Guatemalan Farmers Fight For Land Rights, Local Food, and Sustainable Traditions Endangered by Global Trade Deals‏
by Jeff Abbott
The same forces that have driven many onto the migrant trail have led to the emergence of a movement of young campesinos organizing to stay on their land.