Peace and Justice

Pay Attention! How Being Less Distracted Will Make You Happy
by Richard J. Davidson
Researchers say we’re distracted 47 percent of our lives. Increasing our focus could help us—and the people around us—feel happier.
What Moment Sparked Your #InternationalSisterhood?
by Jasleena Grewal
Lots of us have had a moment in our lives that inspired feelings of support, understanding, and sisterhood toward other women. What was yours?
Why Fixing Climate Change Is Women’s Work
by Kate Stringer
Natural resource scarcity and unpredictable weather affect women first, yet they’re often the last to be heard on how to combat it. That’s slowly changing.
5 Japanese-American Women Activists Left Out of U.S. History Books
by Nina Wallace
A herstory lesson about five women whose World War II internment inspired them to action.
69 Hired, Thousands to Go: Under Pressure, Berkeley Takes First Steps to End UC Labor Abuses
by Mario Vasquez
Boycotts and sit-ins force UC Berkeley to hire outsourced custodians and parking lot attendants, giving them higher wages and better benefits.
New Film About Sex Trafficking Celebrates the Resilience of Children
by Jasleena Grewal
Filmmakers hope “Sold,” based on the bestselling young adult novel, will inspire empathy and action among young viewers.
Forget Nutraloaf—Prisoners Are Growing Their Own Food
by Marcus Harrison Green
From New York to California, prison gardening programs serve as cost-effective food sources and provide inmates with better nutrition.
5 Things Science Says Will Make You Happier
by Kira M. Newman
Happy people are healthier, make more money, and live longer. Thankfully researchers say it’s something we can cultivate with practice. Here’s how.
A Year Later, Kids Turn Baltimore’s Uprising Into Art
by Christine Stoddard
After Freddie Gray’s death, Baltimore photographer Devin Allen’s photo landed on the cover of Time Magazine. Today he’s teaching local youth how to use cameras to tell their own stories.
How Can Public Schools Stop Amplifying Inequality?
by Bill Bigelow
Low-income communities continue to look for the best ways to improve their schools as the income gap grows across America.
Frances Moore Lappé: Why I’m Facing Arrest to Get Money Out of Politics
by James Trimarco
On April 11, thousands of marchers with Democracy Spring will arrive in the nation’s capital. It’s expected to be the largest civil disobedience action in decades.
Unsung Black Heroines Launched a Modern Domestic Workers Movement—Powered By Their Own Stories
by Premilla Nadasen
The struggle for labor rights started decades ago among private household workers, mostly African-American women, whose stories inspired a powerful nationwide movement for dignity.
20 Years in the Making, Great Bear Agreement Protects World’s Largest Temperate Rainforest
by Valerie Schloredt
The landmark deal between 27 First Nations, environmentalists, forest industry, and government preserves 85 percent of old-growth in one of the world’s great forests.
When Communities Decide They’ve Had Enough Violence
by Rev. John Dear
The new Nonviolent Cities project asks us to go beyond calls to end violence and instead create a pervasive culture of nonviolence.
5 Prisons Improving Life on the Inside
by Marcus Harrison Green
From canine cellmates to computer training, prisons across the country are finding small ways to make life behind bars better for inmates.