Peace and Justice

Eleanor: The Radical Roosevelt
by Peter Dreier
Hollywood just can’t seem to tell the truth about Eleanor Roosevelt, who was a fierce defender of human rights. Historian Peter Dreier steps in to set the record straight.
9 Stories That Will Change Your World in 2013
by Sarah van Gelder
2012 was a year of superstorms, mass shootings, debt strikes, and the most spendy election ever. Here’s how last year’s most important stories will shape 2013.
“You Are Safe With Us”: How Ordinary Iraqis Rescued U.S. Civilians in the Midst of War
by Greg Barrett
In 2003, Iraqi townspeople, having just lost their hospital in U.S. air strikes, saved the lives of three wounded U.S. peacemakers. Seven years later, the Americans returned—to thank them.
Pete Seeger: “You Stick Together ’Til It’s Won”
by Kim Ruehl
Book Review: Gleaned from letters, essays, and articles, “Pete Seeger: In His Own Words” reveals how the celebrated folk singer has considered, at every turn, what it means to sing out in a world where the din of injustice is deafening.
Can U.S. Citizens End Israel’s Legal Impunity?
by Stephen Zunes
Each time international law has attempted to censure Israel for its recent violations of human rights, the United States has stepped in to stop the process. If anyone is in a position to do something about this, it’s the U.S. public.
In Gaza Airstrikes, an Appeal to Netanyahu’s Hardliners
by Phyllis Bennis
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu claims that this morning's airstrikes against Hamas targets in Gaza came in response to rocket attacks. The real reason may have more to do with his damaged political reputation at home.
The Hazards of Manhood
by Michael Schwalbe
Am I tough enough? Am I powerful enough? Men put their bodies at risk to cover up pain, fear, and vulnerability.
Photo Essay: Israelis and Palestinians Join Up to Rebuild Homes
by Ben Guss
Volunteers from both the Jewish and Arab sides of the conflict join forces to rebuild homes demolished by the Israeli government.
Nicaragua Withdraws from School of the Americas: “We Have Been Its Victims”
by Colette Cosner
The Nicaraguan president’s decision to withdraw his country from a notorious military training program is firing up activists determined to close the school for good.
Alice Walker: “Go to the Places That Scare You”
by Valerie Schloredt
Why a life worth living is a life worth fighting for.
New NYC Subway Ads: “Love Your Muslim Neighbors”
by Beau Underwood
After hateful ads implying that Muslims are “savages” were posted in New York subway stations, a Christian group launched its own campaign.
Standing with Troy Davis in His Final Days
by Jen Marlowe
A year ago today, the state of Georgia executed a man whose guilt was widely contested. Jen Marlowe, friend and journalist, on what it was like to stand with the Davis family on the last day.
A Mothers’ Movement for Future Generations
by Heidi Hutner
Cancer survivor Heidi Hutner worried about how to raise a baby girl in an increasingly toxic world. Why she, and others, are convening the Women’s Congress for Future Generations to make the earth safe again for our children.
Libyan People to Americans: “This Is Not the Behavior of Our Islam”
Photo Essay: Amid the noise of escalating violence, Benghazi citizens speak for themselves: “This does not represent us.”
RNC Demonstrators Defy Expectations of Violence
by Amos Miers
While Republicans spent the RNC attending corporate-sponsored parties and listening to scripted speeches, protesters’ commitment to nonviolence built alliances that went beyond the usual suspects.