New NYC Subway Ads: “Love Your Muslim Neighbors”

After hateful ads implying that Muslims are “savages” were posted in New York subway stations, a Christian group launched its own campaign.
love your sikh neighbors

This article was originally published on Sojourners and is reposted with permission.

Global tensions between Christians and Muslims are high as reactions to a stridently anti-Muslim film rage on in many countries. By now, most of us have heard about the video, followed the media coverage of the protests, and mourned those, including the U.S. Ambassador to Libya, who have died from the violence.

In the midst of all this, an organization deemed a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center has decided to run ads in New York City subway stations that imply Muslims are “savages.” Many faith groups have spoken out to denounce the offensive ads, but the horse is already out of the barn, as the ads already have been posted and will be seen each day by countless New York City commuters.

Love your muslim neighborsFollowing efforts to push back against anti-Muslim attacks in Missouri and Tennessee, Sojourners announced it will be purchasing ads in the New York City subway bearing a simple, positive message: Love Your Muslim Neighbors. This simple commitment from the Gospel of Matthew (22:39) is an important reminder of how we are to engage all of God’s children, irrespective of whatever differences may exist.

Everyone—regardless of race, religion, or creed—deserves to feel welcomed and safe when riding public transit in America. Sojourners hopes this simple message will stand in stark contrast to the anti-Muslim ads that are drawing so much attention and provide a more hopeful, peaceful, and faithful witness in New York City. 

Beau Underwood serves as the Campaigns Manager for , where this article originally appeared, reposted by YES! Magazine with permission. Photographs provided by Sojourners.

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