Sections
Home » Peace & Justice » Haiti: Aftermath of the Earthquake

Get a FREE Issue. Yes! I want to try YES! Magazine

Nonprofit. Independent. Subscriber-supported. DONATE. How you can support our work.

YES! by Email
Join over 78,000 others already signed up for FREE YES! news.
[SAMPLE]

The YES! ChicoBag(R). Full-size tote that fits in your pocket!

 

Haiti: Aftermath of the Earthquake

Photo Essay: Photographer Willie Davis offers a glimpse into the fallout of the Haitian earthquake, capturing the devastation, life in tent cities, and resilience.

Hait photo essay

On January 12, shortly before 5 p.m., a magnitude 7 earthquake struck about 10 miles southwest of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Although the earthquake lasted 35 seconds, the destruction continues to devastate Haitians over a month later. The death toll stands at over 200,000 people. UN food deliveries did not reach parts of the country's capital for three weeks after the quake.

Photographer Willie Davis offers a glimpse of life in Haiti following the earthquake. His photographs capture the devastation caused by the disaster, the tent cities where survivors are camped out in Port-au-Prince, and the resilience of the people affected.

To view the photo essay, click here.


Willie Davis works as a photographer in New York City. In 2009, he taught photo workshops at the Columbia School of Journalism. He currently contributes to The New York Times and The Village Voice, and his work has appeared in national magazines, film, and TV. His photography has been exhibited in New York City, Washington D.C., and Tokyo.

Interested?
More coverage of Haiti, including Haiti Needs Aid, Not Militarization, A Victory for Haiti, and What You Can Do to Help Haiti.

Email Signup
Comment on this article

How to add a commentCommenting Policy

comments powered by Disqus


You won’t see any commercial ads in YES!, in print or on this website.
That means, we rely on support from our readers.

||   SUBSCRIBE    ||   GIVE A GIFT   ||   DONATE   ||
Independent. Nonprofit. Subscriber-supported.




Current Issue Footer

Personal tools