People Power

Flint Whistleblowers Who Exposed Their Poisoned Water: We’re Just Getting Started
by Larry Gabriel
Long before the state declared an emergency in Flint, Michigan, a pastor, a mother, and an attorney teamed up to reveal the state’s lies about their drinking water.
If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?
by Kim Eckart
Programs across the country are trying to make it easier for new farmers to get started and put down roots. Here's why: There's only one farmer under 35 for every six over 65. By 2030, one-quarter of America's current farmers will retire.
White Privilege II Showed Me What an Unruly Mess We’re In
by Jonathan Cunningham
A Seattle music writer quoted in Macklemore’s controversial new song appreciates how it speaks to young white people—but wishes it had gone further.
As Rising Seas Force Exile, Islanders Hold Fast to What Matters Most
by Keith Barbalato
Pacific Islanders are among the first victims of climate change-induced sea level rise. As natives quickly run out of land and struggle to maintain crops, leaders are searching for ways to protect their people and thousands of years of cultural heritage.
Girl Power in West Africa Comes From Tradition—and Wrestling
by Lindsey Weedston
Female wrestling champion Isabelle Sambou is inspiring a new generation of girls to compete in a sport long dominated by men.
One Clan’s Unique Weapon Against Big Oil
by Stephen Miller
Because the Unist’ot’en clan has given up no land rights after decades of courtroom battles, they maintain a strong foothold on land crucial to future oil expansion plans.
The Deal That Brought the Colorado River Back to the Sea
by Diondra Powers
A new amendment to the 1944 water treaty between Mexico and the United States aims to create a fair, cooperative system for restoring the Colorado River.
Why Young Latinos in Rural California Support Sanders
by Olivia Rodriguez
In California’s predominantly Spanish speaking Eastern Coachella Valley, younger Latinos are showing support for Sanders, upending the narrative that his appeal does not extend beyond white voters.
A Bold Shift to Make Public Schools Serve Low-Income Students
by Abigail Savitch-Lew
Last year, New York City began turning schools in poor neighborhoods into community schools—combining rigorous instruction and extracurricular enrichment with a broad social support system.
Half of America’s Workforce Has No Retirement Plan—But Illinois Has a Fix
by Marcus Harrison Green
Economists see the Illinois Secure Choice Savings Program, designed for private-sector workers, as an innovative complement to Social Security.
How One Affluent Town Helps Its Neediest Students Get Into (and Stay In) College
by Kirk Carapezza
In New England, a community program matches college-savvy parents with first-generation college-bound students to help them navigate the overwhelming application process.
How to Stop an Oil Train: The Hearts-and-Minds Climate Defense That Won Over a Courtroom

by Valerie Schloredt
The Delta 5 loss was actually a big win. “Frankly, the court is convinced that the defendants are far from the problem and are part of the solution to the problem of climate change.”
How Brazilian Women Are Using Graffiti to End the Cycle of Domestic Violence
by Lindsey Weedston
From street art to law reform, women across Brazil are taking a stand against gender-based violence.
In North Dakota’s Booming Oil Patch, One Tribe Beat Back Fracking
by Sarah van Gelder
The Turtle Mountain Band was among the first tribes to ban the drilling process. Here’s the difference it made.
New York’s “Carwasheros” Push for Safer, Fairer Workplaces
by Jean Stevens
Car washes are the “wild, wild West” of workplace regulation. The Car Wash Accountability Act will improve that—if it is ever implemented.