People Power

3 Ways to Bring David Bowie’s Spirit to Your Social Change Work
by Liz Pleasant, James Trimarco
David Bowie pushed boundaries, challenged norms, and helped pop culture become more inclusive. Here’s how to keep his legacy alive.
Every 30 Seconds a Latino in the U.S. Turns 18. The Challenge Is Getting Them to Vote
by Jason Margolis
If they vote more, Latino youth can be a powerful force in coming elections.
Waging Life in a War Zone
by Jen Marlowe
From Gaza’s colorful neighborhood to its underground theater, resistance is an art.
In Photos: The Seed-Saving Farmers Who Pass Down Land to Their Daughters
by Rucha Chitnis
In northeastern India's mountainous state of Meghalaya, youngest daughters inherit the land—and the ancient food heritage of their mothers.
Uber’s Immigrant Drivers Look Forward to Better Pay—and Bigger Voice
by Ana Sofia Knauf
A union for Seattle Uber drivers means finally having the right to a two-way conversation with their multibillion-dollar employer.
Why Do Boys Dress as Warriors and Girls as Princesses? It Starts With the Books They Read
by Peggy Albers
Research shows that children develop their understanding of things like gender and race before the age of 5 from the characters they meet in stories.
How Strong Friendships Defy Dementia
by Marcus Harrison Green
The Momentia movement uses strong social ties to ward off the effects of Alzheimer’s and dementia.
How Filipina Beauty Queens Are Lobbying for Trans Rights
by Lindsey Weedston
In the first episode of their new documentary series, A Woman's Place, filmmakers explain how transgender beauty queens are lobbying for their rights outside of pageants.
Will the TPP Set Back This Campaign to Stop a Proposed Coal Mine Near Montana Tribal Land?
by Sarah van Gelder
The TPP makes the rights of companies sacrosanct, and that includes the right to mine. But what about the rights of people who live in the way of proposed mining sites?
Project Fatherhood: Uniting the Men of LA’s Toughest Communities
by Daniel Ross
In the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, Project Fatherhood helps end the cycle of absent fathers and gives men a place to discuss what it means to be dads, partners, and sons in one of the city's roughest areas.
Six Hopeful Breakthroughs from 2015
by Sarah van Gelder
Despite conflicts and crises at home and abroad, 2015 offered glimpses of the road to a more just, compassionate, and sustainable world.
Was 2015 the Year Big Food Began to Lose Its Sway?
by Andy Bellatti
Companies like Coca-Cola and Monsanto were called out for conflicts of interest, leaving many in the public health sector to wonder if next year transparency might become the new normal.
Standing With Malala: Meet the Teenagers Who Survived the Taliban and Kept Going to School
by Jing Fong, Araz Hachadourian
In the Taliban assassination attempt on Malala Yousafzai, Shazia Ramzan, and Kainat Riaz were also shot—for no more than daring to go to school. Three years later, they’re more committed to education than ever.
8 Amazing Muslim Women Who Would Be Banned From Trump’s America (and Other News to Chew On)
by YES! Staff
The inner lives of drone operators, refugee camps through the eyes of children, and women who would be denied entry to the United States under Donald Trump’s “total shutdown.”
The Risks of Being Heard at COP21: How I Ended Up In a Parisian Jail Cell
by Kate Aronoff
At international summits like COP21, diplomats and dignitaries dominate the dialogue. To see how voices outside the negotiations are heard, I joined a peaceful protest at the Louvre Museum.