People Power

Forget Hunger Strikes. What Prisons Fear Most Is Labor Strikes
by Raven Rakia
Prisoners throughout Alabama and Texas reclaim their humanity—and power—by shutting down the economic infrastructure of their prisons.
Why Economists Are Coming Out in Favor of Unconditional Basic Income
by Leslee Goodman
Economist Guy Standing says the policy can reverse inequality. It also has an invigorating effect on volunteerism, home ownership, and community strength.
How to Not Love the National Parks to Death
by Heather J. Hansen
More visitors than ever will head to national parks this summer. Here’s what we can do to keep the wild in wilderness—and set parks on a sustainable path for the next century.
Climate Change Film Tells Us “How to Let Go of the World”
by Yessenia Funes
In his new documentary, Josh Fox says we can use love to push aside the fear and hopelessness that comes with climate change.
Why We Shouldn’t Call Trump an “Ignorant Bully” (Even When We Really Want To)
by Bill Buzenberg
Name-calling is Donald Trump’s stock-in-trade. Here are five more logical fallacies that kill political discourse and threaten democracy.
What If Trade Agreements Helped People, Not Corporations?
by David Korten
Current trade agreements have been of, by, and for transnational corporations. Growing opposition gives us the opportunity to change that in our next-generation agreements.
Immigrant Moms Were Told They Can’t Have Jobs—So They Started Their Own Tamale Co-op
by Travis Putnam Hill
Employment options can be extremely limited for undocumented immigrants who can’t work legally. These single moms are relying on each other.
Abortion Is Legal and Accessible, Right? Not if You’re Black or Poor and Live in One of These States
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
Restrictive abortion laws disproportionately affect low-income and African-American women.
What If Mental Health First Aid Were as Widespread as CPR? New York City’s Planning to Do It
by Jasleena Grewal
One in every four Americans experiences mental illness, and lack of police understanding can lead to tragedy. Here’s what could happen if we were all trained to deal with depression and anxiety.
As Boomers Retire, Mom-and-Pop Businesses Convert to Co-ops to Save Jobs
by Keli Tianga
Baby boomers are the largest percentage of business owners, and they’re headed toward retirement. Worker cooperatives could keep the jobs they’ve created from disappearing.
A Simple Solution to Low Voter Turnout—Knock at the Front Door
by Kate Stringer
In communities of color where voter turnout has historically lagged, in-person interaction seems to be the most effective fix.
What the War on Reproductive Rights Has to do With Poverty and Race
by Renee Bracey Sherman
Forty years after Roe v. Wade, discourse about reproductive rights must acknowledge how crucial the abortion decision is to gender equity, economic stability, and a healthy life free from violence.
Baby Boxes Cut Infant Mortality in Finland—U.S. Cities Give Them a Try
by Marcus Harrison Green
Five reasons baby boxes are more than cutesy cardboard containers, from offering a safe place to sleep to giving an equal start in life.
Video: Meet the Activists Facing Arrest to Break Free From Big Oil
by Catherina Savattere
Nearly 200 activists arrived in Anacortes, Washington last week to protest our dependence on fossil fuels. They joined others across the globe in the call for a renewable energy transition.
Seattle Students Call for Nationwide Awakening on Campus Racism
by Marcus Harrison Green
Seattle University students plan to sleep outside their dean’s office for as long as it takes her to resign. Will she budge?