People Power

The Next Libyan Revolution Will Be Led by Women Wielding Words—Not Guns
by Alaa Murabit
“Soft power” gives communities words and tools to fight against violence, fear, and corruption and offers youth weapons of peace against an enemy that wants to drag them into war.
After a Century In Decline, Black Farmers Are Back And On the Rise
by Leah Penniman
These Black farmers don’t stop at healthy food. They’re healing trauma, instilling collective values, and changing the way their communities think about the land.
What Does a Feminist Mortician Look Like?
by Jennifer Luxton
Historically, when a man takes care of a corpse, he is a professional. When a woman takes care of a corpse, it’s a domestic task. How can we close the gender gap in the death care industry?
Immigration Is Not Just a Latino Thing. Here’s Why We Need Black Leaders
by Anshantia Oso
For years, the immigrant rights movement has been largely led by Latinos. Today, Black leadership is playing an increasingly important role in the grassroots fight to change U.S. immigration policy.
How Iowa Became the Nation’s Leader In Wind Energy
by Kim Eckart
Even though Iowa is typically associated with red state politics, everyone there seems to agree that wind power makes economic sense for one of the windiest states in the country.
The Tiny House Village Holding a Family Together
by Viola Gaskell
A tiny house complex in Seattle shows what it can do for homeless families by helping one couple raise their baby together under one (very small) roof.
The Little-Known Farmworkers Who Sparked the Biggest Labor Movement In U.S. History
by Alexa Strabuk
There would be no Cesar Chavez without the Filipino manongs of Delano, California, whose decision to strike set off the most significant labor movement the United States has ever seen.
Portland Fast Food Workers Don’t Just Want a Raise—They Want a Union Too
by Tamara Kneese
Employees at Burgerville, a Pacific Northwest restaurant chain, are unionizing and demanding benefits. Even without their employer’s recognition, their union offers an alternative model for organizing low-wage workers.
How Can Southern States Increase Voter Access for Black Residents After DMV Closures?
by YES! Staff
When DMV closures threatened Black voter access in Alabama, the government launched a traveling ID service. But is it enough?
Beyond the NFL: A New Plan to Treat Brain Injuries For Women Escaping Abuse
by Reagan Jackson
Unlike players in the NFL, women who struggle with lifelong effects of concussions from abuse are rarely diagnosed. In Phoenix, scientists and advocates are working to change that.
Still Saying YES!—20 Years of Solutions Journalism
by Sarah van Gelder
Like many startups, YES! Magazine began with an energized small team, an idea we thought important, and a basement office. Twenty years later, we're stronger than ever.
The Pragmatic Impacts of Sanders’ Big Dreams
by Sarah van Gelder
Even with Tuesday’s campaign setbacks, Bernie Sanders’ pledge to make the country more equitable and sustainable is more realistic than some people are letting on.
Humanizing Heroin Addiction: Photos of the Real Lives of Users
by Aaron Goodman
Can more balanced representations of drug users spark discussions on how to solve North America’s heroin epidemic?
A Sanders-Clinton Combined Strategy Could Boost Native Americans’ Quality of Life
by Jennifer Biess
To meet multifaceted needs in Indian Country, Sanders and Clinton should combine their economic proposals.
National Parks Are Used Mostly By Older White People. Here’s Why That Needs to Change
by Lornet ­­­­­­­­­­­­Turnbull
With its history of segregation, the Park Service has had a rocky relationship with race. But if youth of color don’t connect with the outdoors, who will be its future stewards?