People Power

Ranchers and Tribes Unite Once Again to Fight the Keystone XL
by Devi Lockwood
A unique alliance among tribes, ranchers, and other landowners in Nebraska regroups to resist fossil fuel development like the Keystone XL.
4 Not-So-Easy Ways to Dismantle Racism in the Food System
by Leah Penniman
Our food system is built on stolen land and exploited labor. Here’s what we can do it fix it.
What Other Countries Know: Fairer Representation Makes a Stronger Democracy
by Mark Trahant
France (and many of the world’s governments) has figured out that the only way to secure democracy is to require an electoral majority.
How the Ancient Art of Rhetoric Can Help Defend Science
by Leah Ceccarelli
Climate scientists are learning how to choose their words carefully in response to inaccurate but emotive imagery.
After the March for Science, Keep Moving
by Peter Kalmus
This weekend’s march is a start. A climate scientist urges us to follow through in our personal lives as well as in our community.
One Solution to Make Women Scientists More Visible
by Jennifer Luxton
Put them on posters.
Why AARP Is Backing a New Lobbying Group for Millennials
by J. Gabriel Ware
AARP has awarded the Association of Young Americans a $35,000 grant—and both organizations say it’s just the beginning of their relationship.
How Special Elections Could Cost the Republicans
by Mark Trahant
This week, Georgia heads to the polls. Last week, the GOP in Kansas barely earned a win.
In Berlin, a Model for Creative and Affordable Housing
by Sarah van Gelder
Cities with vibrant arts, music, and social scenes are being hit hard by gentrification. But Berlin’s “co-housing culture” shows that a city’s future doesn’t have to go that way.
How One Person’s Small, Brave Compost Pile Changed New York City
by Colin Beavan
While we work to make our government budge, don’t forget that we can also make change ourselves by starting small and local.
The Kendall Jenner Pepsi Memes Made You a Better Person. Think About It
by Rochaun Meadows-Fernandez
Those cleverly captioned photos shared on social media can spark conversations and help build empathy.
CEOs Now Make 300 Times More Than Their Workers. This City Is Putting a Stop to That
by Chuck Collins
Runaway CEO pay contributes to income inequality and ultimately harms companies, so local governments aren’t waiting for a federal fix.
Portland Public Schools First to Put Global Climate Justice in Classroom
by Melissa Hellmann
Students learn about the front lines of global warming and how to be climate activists.
Wildfires Are Essential: The Forest Service Embraces a Tribal Tradition
by Nathan Gilles
The Karuk were once denied the right to practice an ancient tradition. Now scientific and resource management circles are seeing the merits of controlled burning.
Photo Essay: These Sculptures Tell the Story of the First Japanese Americans Sent to Camps
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
The memorial wall is 276 feet long—one foot for every Japanese person who lived on Bainbridge Island in 1942.