Planet

The Pipeline Strikes Back: The Audacity of TransCanada's $15B Suit Against the U.S.
by Jim Shultz
The political saga of the Keystone XL pipeline is like a real-life version of The Force Awakens. So why are we giving the Dark Side even more power?
COP21: Why We Should Care What Climate Scientists Think
by Eric Rehm
As a scientist at COP21, I hoped to see a fruitful collision of the climate scientist and climate activist. I expected strong words regarding science and broader social change, but instead found that scientists who understood the problem seemed to think we could fix it without changing the status quo.
Soon, Oregon Polluters May Have to Pay Residents for Changing the Climate
by Nathan Schneider
A group of activists in Oregon wants polluters to pay residents for using their air. I spoke with Camila Thorndike, director of Oregon Climate, about this unusual effort to put a price on carbon.
COP21: A Rallying Cry—No Climate Justice Without Full Indigenous Rights
by Sarah van Gelder
"We realize that in this country we don’t have political power. So we have always looked at building alliances, coalitions, or being part of coalitions."
Energy Democracy: Inside Californians' Game-Changing Plan for Community-Owned Power
by Al Weinrub
Large utility companies control about 75 percent of the electricity market in California. A hybrid between a public agency and private utility, the new Community Choice program is a model for communities that want greener, cheaper energy.
As State Pols Resist Obama’s Climate Plan, West Virginians Build Renewables Anyway
by Mary Hansen
So far, the state isn’t stepping up to build a solar-powered future. That leaves the bulk of the work to residents.
How Obama’s New EPA Regs Can Bring More Local Control Over Energy—Even in Red States
by Gar Alperovitz
The Clean Power Plan is counting on states to cut carbon emissions. Will they be the new frontiers for change?
10,000 Icelanders Invite Syrian Refugees Into Their Homes (And Other News to Chew On)
by YES! Staff
Scotland takes a new approach to sex work legislation, the VW bus is coming back greener than ever, and Iceland's citizens urge their government to do more for refugees.
Dispatches From the Edge of Change: Why Montana’s Fossil-Fuel Resistance Gives Me Hope
by Sarah van Gelder
Meet the ranchers, grandmothers, professors, and tribes who are bringing back grizzlies, blocking oil equipment deliveries, getting arrested—and having a great time doing it.
Why Breast Milk Is the Ultimate Food Story (And Other News)
by YES! Staff
New Orleans sees a wave of grassroots activism after Katrina, D.C. stops a major utility merger, and a food writer lays out the superpowers of breast milk.
This Trailer Changes Everything: Epic New Naomi Klein Doc Will Have You Running for Your Kayak
by Araz Hachadourian
The film inspired by Klein's book features the stories of everyday people standing up to climate change.
“You Fly to the Edge of the Tar Sands, and ... No Life”: A Montana Professor on the Issue of Our Time
by Sarah van Gelder
University of Montana professor George Price on permaculture, race, and how he’s standing up to tar sands extraction.
On Rooftops of Paris, Expect Green Roofs and Solar Panels
by Tom Lawson
The new French law, which requires renewable energy or plants on all new commercial buildings, is the first of its kind at the national level.
After 20 Years Reporting on Solutions, I’m Going on a Journey to Find Where Hope Lies Now
by Sarah van Gelder
YES! co-founder Sarah van Gelder sets out on a road trip to find the edge of change.
The Crunch: Why Washington D.C. Hired a Herd of Goats (And Other News to Chew On)
by YES! Staff
This week we’re talking about the future of work, a "masculine studies" program... and goats.