Planet

How Iowa Became the Nation’s Leader In Wind Energy
by Kim Eckart
Even though Iowa is typically associated with red state politics, everyone there seems to agree that wind power makes economic sense for one of the windiest states in the country.
How Montanans Stopped the Largest New Coal Mine in North America
by Nick Engelfried
The defeat of what seemed unstoppable—Arch Coal’s Otter Creek mine—marks an encouraging shift in the fight against Big Coal.
I Was a Fourth-Generation Coal Miner. Here’s Why I Quit
by Nick Mullins
“I quit the mines, not entirely sure what I was going to do. I just knew that I could do something different.”
Jobs After Oil: The Path to a Cleaner, More Equal Future
by Yessenia Funes
A successful energy transition to renewables could not only rescue the planet but create a more just economy.
Real Life Hacks to Cut Your Carbon Footprint (Plus: A Personal Emissions Calculator)
by Peter Kalmus
After estimating how his daily actions contributed to global warming, this NASA scientist found a better way to live. How does your carbon footprint stack up? Measure your impact with our emissions calculator.
The West Coast Is the World’s 5th Largest Economy. Can It Unite to Stop Big Oil?
by Arun Gupta
From First Nations activism to innovative city initiatives, the West Coast is leading the fight against global warming even as many countries lag behind.
100% Renewable Energy: What We Can Do in 10 Years
by Richard Heinberg
It will take at least three decades to completely leave behind fossil fuels. But we can do it. And the first step is to start with the easy stuff.
Why We Need to Keep 80 Percent of Fossil Fuels in the Ground
by Bill McKibben
Life depends on it. Bill McKibben on the big changes we’ve already made in remarkably short order.
The Pipeline Strikes Back: The Audacity of TransCanada's $15B Suit Against the U.S.
by Jim Shultz
The political saga of the Keystone XL pipeline is like a real-life version of The Force Awakens. So why are we giving the Dark Side even more power?
COP21: Why We Should Care What Climate Scientists Think
by Eric Rehm
As a scientist at COP21, I hoped to see a fruitful collision of the climate scientist and climate activist. I expected strong words regarding science and broader social change, but instead found that scientists who understood the problem seemed to think we could fix it without changing the status quo.
Soon, Oregon Polluters May Have to Pay Residents for Changing the Climate
by Nathan Schneider
A group of activists in Oregon wants polluters to pay residents for using their air. I spoke with Camila Thorndike, director of Oregon Climate, about this unusual effort to put a price on carbon.
COP21: A Rallying Cry—No Climate Justice Without Full Indigenous Rights
by Sarah van Gelder
"We realize that in this country we don’t have political power. So we have always looked at building alliances, coalitions, or being part of coalitions."
Energy Democracy: Inside Californians' Game-Changing Plan for Community-Owned Power
by Al Weinrub
Large utility companies control about 75 percent of the electricity market in California. A hybrid between a public agency and private utility, the new Community Choice program is a model for communities that want greener, cheaper energy.
As State Pols Resist Obama’s Climate Plan, West Virginians Build Renewables Anyway
by Mary Hansen
So far, the state isn’t stepping up to build a solar-powered future. That leaves the bulk of the work to residents.
How Obama’s New EPA Regs Can Bring More Local Control Over Energy—Even in Red States
by Gar Alperovitz
The Clean Power Plan is counting on states to cut carbon emissions. Will they be the new frontiers for change?