Planet

A Clear Choice: My Fossil Fuels—or 5.6 Million People Fleeing a Hurricane
by Peter Kalmus
Collective action is made up of individuals leading the way, showing what’s possible, shifting the normal.
Goodbye, Small Farmer? Investors Could Soon Own Most of American Farmland
by Katy Keiffer
Today, 30 percent of American farmland is owned by non-operators who lease it out to farmers. Here’s why that’s a problem.
5 Ways to Take Your Love of the Outdoors to the Next Level
by Melissa Hellmann
This summer, get outside, roll up your sleeves, and take a stand for public lands.
Wildfires Are Essential: The Forest Service Embraces a Tribal Tradition
by Nathan Gilles
The Karuk were once denied the right to practice an ancient tradition. Now scientific and resource management circles are seeing the merits of controlled burning.
A Small Act of Scientific Civil Disobedience
by Margaret Beaton
Big science publications put important peer-reviewed research behind expensive paywalls. But some scientists have found creative ways around them.
Why Science Can’t Be Silent
by Clo Copass, Kim Eckart, Tracy Loeffeholz Dunn
Up against the White House’s “alternative facts” and attempts to hide climate data, new allies—citizens and science—can prevail against politicians and corporations.
In California’s Imperial Valley, Residents Aren’t Waiting for Government to Track Pollution
by Paulina Phelps
For marginalized communities along the California-Mexico border, projects to gather and share scientific reports are crucial to holding agencies accountable.
“Valve Turner” Case a Mistrial, but Also a Warning for Direct Action Activists
by Valerie Schloredt
Criminal sabotage was one of the charges for Ken Ward, who with fellow activists in Minnesota, Montana, and North Dakota shut down pipelines carrying tar sands oil.
First Statewide Carbon Tax Is What Our Climate Moment Demands
by Richard H. Gammon
Climate scientists like me need to be clear about the global danger. Putting a price on CO2 would slow warming more effectively than any other policy tool we have available.
Why Exxon Loves the Carbon Tax—and Voters Should Not
by Wenonah Hauter
Washington state is considering putting a price on carbon emissions. This will not fix our climate problem and, in fact, will help fossil fuel companies continue to profit from it.
Calling All Climate Activists: “Go Out and Get Yourself in Some Holy Trouble”
by Valerie Schloredt
After activists launched a strike shutting off the flow of tar sands oil across the U.S. this week, a movement leader calls for more faith-based direct action.
Will Historic Standing Rock Talks Change U.S.-Tribe Relationships?
by Tristan Ahtone
The Department of Justice promised to consider nationwide reform in how the U.S. treats tribal land. Legal experts consider what, exactly, that might look like.
If Real Change Starts at the Bottom, Why Is the Green Party Focused on the White House?
by Sam Smith
Campaigns are a tactic, like protests and boycotts, and the trick is to use them wisely, not to prove how good you are.
Can Washington State Save the Fewer Than 10 Grizzly Bears It Has Left?
by Michael J. Dax
Environmentalists, industry, and politicians have a second chance to learn from decades of wolf debates and save the grizzlies.
If It Hadn’t Been for Those Meddling Climate Kids ...
by Stephen Miller
We can thank our children—and their lawsuits—for insisting that public trust and hard science be part of climate decision-making.