Planet

A Clear Choice: My Fossil Fuels—or 5.6 Million People Fleeing a Hurricane
by Peter Kalmus
Collective action is made up of individuals leading the way, showing what’s possible, shifting the normal.
Goodbye, Small Farmer? Investors Could Soon Own Most of American Farmland
by Katy Keiffer
Today, 30 percent of American farmland is owned by non-operators who lease it out to farmers. Here’s why that’s a problem.
5 Ways to Take Your Love of the Outdoors to the Next Level
by Melissa Hellmann
Get outside, roll up your sleeves, and take a stand for public lands.
Why You Should Be Saving Seeds (Even If You Don’t Have a Garden)
by Doug Pibel
Watch this movie to get inspired about saving seeds. And then do it.
The West Coast Will Determine the Fate of the Fossil Fuel Industry
by Arun Gupta
All along the Pacific Coast, environmentalists are gearing up for an epic fight.
Why the People Who Grow Your Food Are Worried About Scott Pruitt
by James Trimarco, J. Gabriel Ware
Pruitt’s approach to the EPA is likely to threaten farmworkers, who are highly exposed to the effects of climate change, including heat stress and increased pesticide use.
In California’s Imperial Valley, Residents Aren’t Waiting for Government to Track Pollution
by Paulina Phelps
For marginalized communities along the California-Mexico border, projects to gather and share scientific reports are crucial to holding agencies accountable.
“Valve Turner” Case a Mistrial, but Also a Warning for Direct Action Activists
by Valerie Schloredt
Criminal sabotage was one of the charges for Ken Ward, who with fellow activists in Minnesota, Montana, and North Dakota shut down pipelines carrying tar sands oil.
The Fix-It Shop Where Neighbors Repair Your Clothes and Electronics
by Araz Hachadourian
Three years ago, they started a program to keep salvageable goods from landfills by harnessing the community’s collective skills to fix them.
Wisconsin Tribe Halts $1.5 Billion Open-Pit Mine
by Jaime Alfaro
To protect vital wetlands, the Ojibwe tribe and local scientists and activists pressured industry to abandon plans for what would have harmed thousands of species of plants and animals.
In One of the Nation’s Unhealthiest Places, This Hospital Prescribes Fresh Food From Its Own Farm
by Liza Bayless
In an industry usually focused on medicine and procedures, a Philadelphia-area hospital decided what its patients needed was a farm and advice about food.
North Dakota’s Public Bank Was Built for the People—Now It’s Financing Police at Standing Rock
by Matt Stannard
The nation’s only state bank was created to empower small farmers and local economies, but now it’s being used to silence indigenous people with militarized force. How did this happen?
“This Is the Right Thing to Do”: Energy CEO on Ending Leases to Drill Near Blackfeet Nation
by Michael J. Dax
After 35 years of fighting for the cancellation of nearly 50 oil and gas leases, Montana's Blackfeet tribe scored an unexpected victory when Devon Energy voluntarily backed out of their claims.
How I Stopped Mindlessly Buying Things
by Sarah Lazarovic
Stores want me to buy stuff I don’t need. The internet wants me to buy stuff I don’t need. But I finally figured it out.
First Statewide Carbon Tax Is What Our Climate Moment Demands
by Richard H. Gammon
Climate scientists like me need to be clear about the global danger. Putting a price on CO2 would slow warming more effectively than any other policy tool we have available.