Planet

Newly Released Tim DeChristopher Finds a Movement Transformed by His Courage
by Melanie Jae Martin
Tim DeChristopher, who was just released from federal custody, is best known as the man who disrupted an auction of pristine public lands. But there’s more to his story than his role as “Bidder 70.”
Donald Trump Picks the Wrong Scottish Farmers to Brawl With
by Chris Francis
When Donald Trump tried to develop a stretch of pristine Scottish seaside into a golf course, the feisty local community pushed back. A new documentary film tells the story.
At Seattle Idle No More Event, A Mix of Ceremony and Protest
by Kristin Hugo
Saturday’s Idle No More event showed that a beach can be the perfect place for a protest when a movement is drawing attention to the relationship between people and water.
Puget Sound Tribe Plans for Rising Seas
by Benjamin Drummond, Sara Steele
Video: The Swinomish tribe could lose up to 15 percent of their land on low-lying Fidalgo Island to climate-change related sea level rise. They’re working with planners to make sure they can survive—and thrive—in the region’s changing climate.
People We Love: Leia Lewis Henderson
by Laura Beans
Nurturing African-American culture through gardening.
Students to Colleges: Take Our Money Out of Dirty Energy
by Sachie Hopkins-Hayakawa
A divestment campaign led by students is changing the national conversation about energy, creating a market for sustainable stocks, and linking up students with communities facing off against the fossil fuel industry.
Why I Returned My Queen Elizabeth Medal of Honor
by Maude Barlow
A letter to Canada’s Governor General explains why Maude Barlow–together with Idle No More–are speaking out against the country’s new environmental rules.
Ta’Kaiya Blaney on First Nations: “We’re Awake and We’re Standing Up”
Video: She’s only 11 years old, but she’s already been working for environmental justice for a few years now. Here, she addresses the crowd at an Idle No More event in British Columbia.
Welcome to Blockadia!
by Melanie Jae Martin, Jesse Fruhwirth
The corporate push to construct tar-sands pipelines is transforming the environmental movement across North America by increasing the involvement of local residents and normalizing the use of direct action.
Remembering Rebecca Tarbotton
by Tina Gerhardt
A tribute to the beloved environmentalist, human right activist, and executive director of the Rainforest Action Network.
Ontario First Nation Wins Cleaner Forest after 10 Years of Logging Blockade
by Anna Willow
On December 3, 2002, members of the Grassy Narrows First Nation blockaded the road used to haul logs out of the area. Ten years later, their persistence has paid off in the form of cleaner water and a healthier forest in which to live.
BP’s Civil Fines Could be 10 Times Larger than Record Criminal Penalty
by Signe Predmore
The $4.5 billion oil giant BP has agreed to pay out for criminal misconduct related to the Deepwater Horizon spill is too small to change the company’s business model. Yet more and bigger payments are likely to come.
More Than Nutritious: Why Organics Are Still Healthier
by Robin Broad, John Cavanagh
Two recent studies concluded that organic food is no more nutritious than non-organic food. But the value of organics involves health on multiple levels, from that of farmers to eaters to the planet itself.
Will “Frankenstorm” Hurricane Sandy End Climate Silence?
by Duncan Meisel
While our two main candidates for president have avoided the topic of global warming, the climate itself is anything but silent.
Alberta Tar Sands Illegal under Treaty 8, First Nations Charge
by Kristin Moe
In 1899, First Nations in northern Alberta signed a treaty with Queen Victoria that enshrined their right to practice traditional lifeways. Today, it’s the basis for a legal challenge to Shell Oil’s mining of tar sands.