Planet

How This Library Paid $1 to Install Its Solar Panels
by Mary Hansen
In West Virginia, Solar Holler helps nonprofits install solar panels for less than the price of a cup of coffee.
Can We Save Our Planet? What the Climate Movement Can Learn From the Nuclear Freeze Campaign
by Duncan Meisel
The Nuclear Freeze Campaign of the 1980s saved the world from nuclear war. Here's what today's climate activists can learn from its success.
This College Student Chained Herself to a Shell Oil Ship for Three Days. Here’s Why.
by Araz Hachadourian
Will young activists do anything to stop oil drilling in the Arctic?
“Mad Max: Fury Road” Is a Resource-Conscious Blockbuster for Our Time
by Kate Aronoff
Who ruined Mad Max’s world? The new film isn't afraid to lay blame — and suggest a way forward.
These Friends from High School Bought an Abandoned Factory. Now They're Distilling Artisanal Whiskeys‏
by Samuel Dolgin-Gardner
Much as blight can be contagious, so can renewal. How grassroots community groups are saving neighborhoods and building new businesses.
Where Do “Rednecks” Really Come From? A New Museum Has the Surprising Answer
by Catherine V. Moore
Tourists spend $400 more per trip on average when their trips focus on history and culture. That could be a big opportunity for West Virginia's changing economy.
Even in a Drought, California Farms Have a Future—But They’ll Need Local Control to Succeed
by Keith Harrington
Some California farmers have discovered ways to farm that use very little water, yet thirstier methods still dominate. What gives?
Want the Best Solutions for California’s Epic Drought? Ask a Farmworker from the Central Valley
by Sarah Mirk
“Low-income disadvantaged communities are the best water conservationists: At the end of the day, we’re not going to waste water because it costs money.”
Young Guatemalan Farmers Fight For Land Rights, Local Food, and Sustainable Traditions Endangered by Global Trade Deals‏
by Jeff Abbott
The same forces that have driven many onto the migrant trail have led to the emergence of a movement of young campesinos organizing to stay on their land.
Is the Local Economy Too Local? Why Co-Ops and Credit Unions Need a Broader Strategy
by Keith Harrington
Author and activist Gar Alperovitz calls it a “checkerboard strategy.” In the first piece in a series, we look at the organizations working to transform our economy, and how they can benefit from working together.
Why Seattleites Think They Can Stop Shell Oil From Drilling in the Arctic
by James Trimarco, Araz Hachadourian
The Port of Seattle has welcomed the oil company to temporarily moor its drilling rig before it’s towed to Alaska. But these protestors are threatening to block it.
The U.S. Has Nearly 600 Coal Waste Sites. Why They've Got West Virginians Worried
by Erin L. McCoy
Residents fear that coal-contaminated water is seeping into their wells. But a lack of evidence is stalling action.
Food Stamps Are Worth Double at These Michigan Farmers Markets—Helping Families and Local Businesses
by Araz Hachadourian
The USDA is putting $31 million behind a program that helps low-income families take home twice the veggies, and local farmers make twice the money.
Bill McKibben: How a Lawyer From the Jim Crow South Shaped the Fight Against Climate Change
by Bill McKibben
In his memoir, James Gustave Speth talks about his work to end climate change and why it's time for a new environmental movement.
Big City Living May Help You Slow Down, Stress Less, and Be Happy‏. Really!
by Zanna McKay
From New York City to Barcelona, cities across the world are turning to “slow living” to make their communities happier and healthier in the face of increasing urbanization.