Planet

Will Historic Standing Rock Talks Change U.S.-Tribe Relationships?
by Tristan Ahtone
The Department of Justice promised to consider nationwide reform in how the U.S. treats tribal land. Legal experts consider what, exactly, that might look like.
Climate Justice Meets Racism: This Moment at Standing Rock Was Decades in the Making
by Jenni Monet
North Dakota’s militarized response to activists opposing the Dakota Access pipeline—and the Standing Rock Sioux’s fierce resolve—reflect the area's particular racial divides.
At Standing Rock, a Sense of Purpose: “This Is How We Should Be Living”
by Sarah van Gelder
Protecting the water and sacred sites brought people here. The experience of being here is changing lives.
Tribes Redraw Land Boundaries—With GPS and a Small Fleet of Drones
by Tristan Ahtone
From the Standing Rock Sioux to the Wounaan in Panama, indigenous communities are staking claims to traditional territories even when they no longer possess ownership rights.
The Big Difference at Standing Rock Is Native Leadership All Around
by Sarah van Gelder
Dallas Goldtooth, a veteran organizer of the Keystone XL fight, is amazed at the historic support from tribes at Standing Rock—even tribes that rely on resource extraction.
Obama Pipeline Plot Twist Is Not a Victory—And Could Erase the Struggle
by Kelly Hayes
The illusion of victory is a dangerous thing. We could undo what we have built at Standing Rock, this unprecedented act of Native American collective resistance.
If Real Change Starts at the Bottom, Why Is the Green Party Focused on the White House?
by Sam Smith
Campaigns are a tactic, like protests and boycotts, and the trick is to use them wisely, not to prove how good you are.
Feds Step In, and the Big Win May Be for All Tribes Facing Pipelines
by Tracy Loeffelholz Dunn
The Department of Justice promised “meaningful tribal input” on pipeline decisions and the protection of tribal lands, resources, and treaty rights.
How Obama Can Keep the Standing Rock Sioux Standoff From Turning Bloody
by Mark Trahant
The Nixon White House managed three Indian occupations. There are lessons for President Obama there—if he would just pay attention.
Can Zoos Teach Us To Be Better Humans?
by David Korten
If we can recognize our destruction of other animals’ habitats, perhaps we can recognize our destruction of all the living systems on which we depend.
Threat of Salmon Extinction Turns Small Tribe Into Climate Researchers
by Nathan Gilles
As glaciers disappear, fish are expected to follow. But the Nooksack tribe of Washington state has a plan to keep nearby rivers and streams cool.
I Took a Side Job Selling Cherries at Pike Place—And Now Love the Farming World
by Fan Kong
There is a profound sense of community born from the gathering of people and the exchange of goods at a market.
In This Food Desert, Kids Learn to Farm Veggies—Out of the Back of a Truck
by Rachel Shulhafer
For the past year, the Food Literacy Project in Louisville, Kentucky, has sent its garden-on-wheels to local food deserts, connecting people to healthy eating and changing the lives of young people.
The World’s Biggest School Meal Program Is Keeping Local Farmers in Business
by Chris Arsenault
Emphasizing local food under a radical policy of “zero hunger,” Brazil’s school lunch initiative helps small farmers buy the land they’ve been farming for generations.
Yes, They’re Killing the Wolves—But There’s More To It
by Stephen Miller
Misdirected public outrage over the killing of a Washington wolf pack may do more harm than good.