Planet

How to Turn Your Old Calendar Into a Gift Bag
by Alyssa B. Johnson
Six steps for turning your old calendars into holiday gift bags.
At Climate Talks, an Answer Grows Outside
by Luis A. Ubiñas
In Mexico, communities own and manage their own forests, a proven method for reducing deforestation.
What’s Next for Offshore Energy?
by Mariam Baksh
On the Atlantic Coast, offshore oil drilling is out—and wind energy is in.
How We Saved the Climate (and Ourselves)
by Bill McKibben
Bill McKibben imagines himself in the year 2100, looking back at a century of climate chaos and asking: What did it take to save the world?
Maude Barlow: Read Me My Environmental Rights
by Madeline Ostrander
An international movement—of governments, scientists, and activists—is bringing a focus on environmental rights to the climate negotiations in Cancún.
In Mexico City, a Message for Cancún
by Laura Carlsen
Why peasant farmers in Mexico are taking the UN climate negotiations seriously.
Families In Hard Times
by Sarah van Gelder
Multigenerational households, same-sex partnerships, and stay-at-home dads: The Winter 2011 issue of YES! Magazine explores our changing sense of family.
Join YES! for No Impact Week
You’re invited to a one-week carbon cleanse that could change the way you think about your life—and the planet, too.
Big Problem, Big Art
Photo essay: As climate negotiators meet in Cancun, activists the world over are reminding them of what’s at stake with some very big art.
Cycle City, USA
by Jay Walljasper
How Portland plans to become the first world-class bike city in America.
When Crop Mobs Take Over
by Tina Chadwick
In Atlanta, city slickers have found a way to give back to the farms that feed them.
The World’s First Living Buildings
by Eden Brukman
Once deemed too ambitious, the next generation of green building is now a reality.
You Are Who You Eat With
by Katherine Gustafson
Why hectic times call for a return to the family meal.
In Coal Country, A Win for Clean Energy
by Sue Sturgis
A Kentucky power cooperative had plans to burn more coal. Local residents instead demanded cleaner energy and greater efficiency—and won.
Signs of Life :: Winter 2011
Small stories about big change.