Planet

Only Six Years After BP Oil Disaster, Gulf Coast Is Faced With New Drilling
by Kate Stringer
Still recovering from the worst oil spill in U.S. history, Gulf Coast activists battle the threat of new offshore oil wells.
Tiny Houses Are Cute, But Can You Actually Cook a Meal in One?
by Ellie Lillstrom
As an avid cook I wondered what orchestrating a sizable meal would be like in the two-burner kitchen of a 250-square-foot home. So I gave it a try with my favorite recipe.
After a Century In Decline, Black Farmers Are Back And On the Rise
by Leah Penniman
These Black farmers don’t stop at healthy food. They’re healing trauma, instilling collective values, and changing the way their communities think about the land.
What Does a Feminist Mortician Look Like?
by Jennifer Luxton
Historically, when a man takes care of a corpse, he is a professional. When a woman takes care of a corpse, it’s a domestic task. How can we close the gender gap in the death care industry?
Why the Economy Should Stop Growing—And Just Grow Up
by David Korten
“How do we grow the economy?” is an obsolete question. Local initiatives across the world are looking for maturity instead as they rebuild caring, place-based communities and economies.
How Iowa Became the Nation’s Leader In Wind Energy
by Kim Eckart
Even though Iowa is typically associated with red state politics, everyone there seems to agree that wind power makes economic sense for one of the windiest states in the country.
What’s a Carbon Farmer? How California Ranchers Use Dirt to Tackle Climate Change
by Sally Neas
Scientists believe that simple land management techniques can increase the rate at which carbon is absorbed from the atmosphere and stored in soils.
What Small Farms Need to Compete With Corporate Food
by Kate Stringer
Most small farms have to follow the same rules as big corporate ones. In Maine, flexible food ordinances have increased the number of small farmers.
Retrofitting Suburbia: Communities Innovate Their Way Out of Sprawl
by Erin Sagen
The future for suburbanites, who now have twice the carbon footprint of city dwellers, seems to be pointing backward to pre-automobile, train-based living.
National Parks Are Used Mostly By Older White People. Here’s Why That Needs to Change
by Lornet ­­­­­­­­­­­­Turnbull
With its history of segregation, the Park Service has had a rocky relationship with race. But if youth of color don’t connect with the outdoors, who will be its future stewards?
Salmon—It’s What’s For Dinner (Even If You’re a Tree)
by Jennifer Luxton, Stephen Miller
Each year, immense schools of migrating salmon bring nutrients from the ocean to Pacific Northwest rivers—literally feeding the trees. Here’s where humans come in.
In Photos: The Indigenous Protectors of the World’s Most Sacred Places
by Christopher McLeod
All around the world, sites sacred to indigenous people are besieged by mining, tourism, and other threats. Meet the groups safeguarding and restoring them.
This Earth Day, Listen Up: Mother Earth Is Calling Us Back
by David Korten
Those of us who succumbed to the false promises of Western consumerism at great cost to the planet and to ourselves are Earth’s prodigal children now returning home.
The Seed-Saving Farmers Securing the Future of Food
by Erin Sagen
The problems of—and the solutions for—our industrialized food system start at the most basic level: the seed.
Video: This New York Farm Wants to Fix the “Food Apartheid”
by Jasleena Grewal
Soul Fire Farm provides farm education to Black and Latino youth in an effort to end a history of racism and injustice in America's food system.