Planet

If There Are No New Farmers, Who Will Grow Our Food?
by Kim Eckart
Programs across the country are trying to make it easier for new farmers to get started and put down roots. Here's why: There's only one farmer under 35 for every six over 65. By 2030, one-quarter of America's current farmers will retire.
As Rising Seas Force Exile, Islanders Hold Fast to What Matters Most
by Keith Barbalato
Pacific Islanders are among the first victims of climate change-induced sea level rise. As natives quickly run out of land and struggle to maintain crops, leaders are searching for ways to protect their people and thousands of years of cultural heritage.
One Clan’s Unique Weapon Against Big Oil
by Stephen Miller
Because the Unist’ot’en clan has given up no land rights after decades of courtroom battles, they maintain a strong foothold on land crucial to future oil expansion plans.
The Deal That Brought the Colorado River Back to the Sea
by Diondra Powers
A new amendment to the 1944 water treaty between Mexico and the United States aims to create a fair, cooperative system for restoring the Colorado River.
How to Stop an Oil Train: The Hearts-and-Minds Climate Defense That Won Over a Courtroom

by Valerie Schloredt
The Delta 5 loss was actually a big win. “Frankly, the court is convinced that the defendants are far from the problem and are part of the solution to the problem of climate change.”
In North Dakota’s Booming Oil Patch, One Tribe Beat Back Fracking
by Sarah van Gelder
The Turtle Mountain Band was among the first tribes to ban the drilling process. Here’s the difference it made.
The New Face of Hunger: How Statistics Underestimate the Food Problem
by Frances Moore Lappé
Today, 800 million of us are considered “hungry,” but we produce enough calories to feed us all. Rather than a lack of food, we’re dealing with a lack of democracy.
Big Oil and Gas Want Them Out, But One Small Clan Is Standing Up to Pipeline Expansion
by Tony Manno
A First Nations clan is bringing pipeline projects to a grinding halt—simply by occupying their traditional lands.
Another Extinction: Words We Use to Describe the Natural World
by Jack Turner
Why naturalists and their linguistic allies fight to keep the language that gives us our sense of place from falling out of modern dictionaries.
Meet the Indigenous Eco-feminists of the Amazon
by Lindsey Weedston
In Ecuador, indigenous Kichwa women are resisting corporate interests that threaten their land.
Canadian Company Sues U.S. for Blocking Keystone XL—and Shows How the TPP Can Hurt Climate
by John Light
Environmentalists have worked for years to get governments to regulate fossil fuels. Here’s how trade deals like the Trans-Pacific Partnership make that even harder.
In Photos: The Seed-Saving Farmers Who Pass Down Land to Their Daughters
by Rucha Chitnis
In northeastern India's mountainous state of Meghalaya, youngest daughters inherit the land—and the ancient food heritage of their mothers.
A Neighborhood Revolution in a Pot of Soup
by Shelley McEuen
After living in the same town for 14 years, I decided it was finally time to meet my neighbors. My secret? Soup night.
Will the TPP Set Back This Campaign to Stop a Proposed Coal Mine Near Montana Tribal Land?
by Sarah van Gelder
The TPP makes the rights of companies sacrosanct, and that includes the right to mine. But what about the rights of people who live in the way of proposed mining sites?
Inside New Mexico’s Community Made from Trash
by YES! Staff
People who live in this desert community of earthships say their homes can serve as a model for how society can function happily without the infrastructure and modern systems we’ve come to expect.